CHIPPEWA COUNTY OBITUARIES

This page contains transcriptions of obituaries which were published in local newspapers. Also included are accidents on Lake Superior which resulted in the deaths of passengers and/or crewmen. Actual shipwreck accounts - even those which contain loss of life - will be placed on a separate Shipwrecks page.

These records were transcribed from microfilm. Quality of the microfilm varies according to the preserved state of the original newspaper when it was filmed. All original spelling and punctuation is preserved in the transcription. For words were the text is missing or where guesses at spelling have been made, the words will be enclosed in brackets [ ].

Unless a specific town or township is mentioned, the record refers to events in Sault Ste. Marie

If you would like to contribute transcriptions to this project, please send them to the coordinator.


~B~

BACKUS;

DIED
At the Saut Ste. Marie, on the morning of the 8th of June, 1851, after a brief but painful illness, Rosalie, daughter of Andrew Backus, Esq., aged 21 years.
A most devoted and affectionate daughter, a faithful member of the Protestant Episcopal Church, in the midst of youth and of life, with every capacity to enjoy it, and cheering hopes before her, she has been suddenly withdrawn by an Almighty hand from the arms of her agonized parents; yet knowing that her Redeemer liveth. [Com.]
Lake Superior Journal, 11 Jun 1851, vol. 2 no. 5, p. 3.

BACON;

DIED
In this place on the 16th inst., Mr. Anson Bacon, of Pontiac, Mich.
Mr. B. came up with his family the day before on the London, on his way to Eagle River. He was very seasick during the passage and quite unwell when he landed, and during the night he took a large quantity of Camphor sufficient, it is supposed by his physician, to have produced his sudden death.
His bereaved widow and children returned home on the same boat with his remains.
Lake Superior Journal, 21 Aug 1850, vol. 1 no. 16, p. 3.

BARBEAU;

DIED
At the Saut de Ste. Marie, July 22nd, Augusta, daughter of P.B. Barbeau, Esq., aged four years. She was a child of intellectual development of mind, but has been suddenly removed from us to realms of brighter day.
Lake Superior News, 20 Jul 1847, vol. 1 no. 17, p. 3.

Demise of Mrs. A. L. Barbeau
Mrs. Archange L. Barbeau, widow of the late Hon. P. B. Barbeau, died at her residence on Water street Monday morning at 6 o'clock. The deceased was 85 years of age. Mrs. Barbeau was one of the oldest residents in the city and had lived for 55 years in the house wherein she died. Two daughters, Mrs. J. P. Pendill, of Marquette, and Mrs. M. W. Scranton, of this city, besides nine grand children and six great grandchildren, survive her. She left considerable property
Sault Ste. Marie (MI) Evening News, July 27, 1895 Page 1
Submitted by gmglory@ejourney.com

BARKER;

MRS. AGNES J. BARKER
Mrs. Agnes Jane Barker, 54, a resident of the Sault for the past 30 years, died at her home at 9 Garfield apartments at 12:40 a.m. today, Thursday, December 27, 1934, after an illness of one year following a stroke of paralysis.

Mrs. Barker was born in Sault, Ont., Feb. 20, 1880.

She is survived by one daughter, Madeline, and two sons, Walter and John all of the Sault; three sisters, Miss Blanche and Miss Julia Roussam of Sault, Ont. and Mrs. Frances Galloway of Hamilton, Ont; and two brothers, John and Oren of Sault, Ont.

Mrs. Barker was a member of the St. Marys church and the Sacred Heart society.

Funeral services will be held Saturday at St. Marys church at 8:30 a.m.

The body will be at the Newhouse funeral home until Friday afternoon when it will be removed to her home.
(unknown paper, possibly Soo Evening News - submitted by Sharon Johnson)

BARR;

CITY BREVITIES
An infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Barr died on Wednesday and was buried on Friday. The child was twenty days old.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 25 Aug 1888, p. 1

BERTRAM;

CITY BREVITIES
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bertram have the sympathy of the entire community in the bereavement occasioned by the death of their three year old daughter which occured last Saturday.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 28 Jan 1888, p. 8

FRANK BERTRAM DEAD
Frank Bertram, the well known livery-man died Friday morning from a complication of disorders, chief among which was inflammation of the bowels. Mr. Bertram had been ill about ten days. He had not been in perfect health, his physicians say, for many years. Several years ago he was obliged to submit to an operation. He was a stirring business man and enjoyed a wide acquaintance in this city, and is highly spoken of by those who knew him. The funeral will occur this afternoon at three o'clock.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 11 Aug 1888, p. 1

BESANT;

Son of Former Sault Woman Drowns in East
Daniel G Besant, small son of Mrs. K.G. Besant, formerly Margaret Gabriel of the Sault, was drowned near his home at Hainesport, New Jersey, according to word received here today by Miss Agnes Gabriel 551 Bingham Avenue. While no details of the accident were given, it was said that the body was recovered 24 hours after the boy was drowned. The body was taken by his parents to Buffalo, New York, their home for burial.
Evening News, Sault Ste Marie, MI, Aug 23, 1926
Submitted by gmglory@ejourney.com

BONNO;

MRS. LEO BONNO
A Friend Contributes an Interesting Sketch of a Late Resident.
ED, NEWS: Mrs. Leo Bonno, who dropped dead, the other day, at the residence of Mrs. Chas. Giest, on Canal street, was an old and respected resident. Mrs. Bonno was feeling quite well and walked to the depot to see a friend go away on the train. Shortly after the train left she had a fainting spell and thought she would go to Mrs. Giest, her niece, who lives near the depot, but before she got to Mrs. Giest's she beckoned to them to come to her. She was seen and helped to the house and died shortly after. The only words she spoke being, "Oh, My children." Mrs. Bonno was a good mother and a hard working woman, always pleasant and pleasing to converse with. The writer had many a pleasant chat with her. Mrs. Bonno was the widow, of the late Leo Bonno, who died here quite suddenly twelve years ago. Mrs. Leo Bonno was born at Red River, Minn., February 24th, 1821, and came to the Soo when but a mere child in 1830, in company with her parents coming from Red River to the Soo in a birch bark canoe. Steamboats in those days were very scarce on Lake Superior. Mrs. Bonno had three brothers and one sister, two brothers enlisted in the late rebellion and both were killed on the battlefield. Her sister is still living and it is supposed she has a brother still living at red River. She was married at Sault Ste. Marie in the year 1841 to the late Leo Bonno. She was the mother of fourteen children, nine of whom grew up to manhood and womanhood. Seven of them who live in this city, and are well known, are: Mrs. Antoine Piquette, Mrs. Joseph Lecoy, Mrs. Adolph Pigeon, Miss Josephine, Joseph, Leo and Peter Bonno. Mrs. L. D. Jenne, who died at Cheboygan two year ago, was another daughter and Mrs. Bonno's oldest son, Johnnie Bonno, was killed many years ago at Negaunee. Mrs. Bonno was a grandmother to a great many children and also a great grandmother. Her death was similar to her late husband, quite sudden. She died at Sault Ste. Marie, May 12th, 1892, of heart trouble at the age of seventy-one years and three months. She was very smart and active for one of her years. Her death is a sad blow to her children, who have the sympathy of the entire community.
AN OLD FRIEND.
Sault Ste. Marie News, May 28, 1892, Page 7
Submitted by gmglory

Allie, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leo Bonno died Sunday and was interred Tuesday in Maple Ridge cemetery.
Sault Ste. Marie News, Saturday, October 28, 1899, Page 6
Submitted by gmglory

BOWKER;

DIED
In this village, on the 4th inst., Christiana, wife of John Bowker, Esq., of Saut Ste. Marie, Canada West, aged 26 years.
Mr. Bowker takes this opportunity of returning his sincere thanks to the respectable circle of his American friends, for their kind attention during her sickness.
Lake Superior Journal, 10 Jul 1850, vol. 1 no. 10, p. 2.

BRENIFF;

DROWNED
Patrick Breniff, of Ireland, was found drowned on the morning of the 16th inst., at the Head of the Portage. He was a sailor on board the Propeller Napoleon, a sober and good seaman; and is supposed to have accidently fallen from the pier, while going to or from the vessel the night before. He leaves a wife in Detroit to mourn his loss.
Lake Superior Journal, 21 Aug 1850, vol. 1 no. 16, p. 3.

BRIGGS;

DROWNED
Wayne J. Tromble, and Phineas P. Briggs, formerly of this place, were drowned near Drummond Island, on Tuesday week. -- The boat in which they were was supposedly upset. Both were about forty years of age, and have left families residing on Drummond Island, to which place they had recently removed. Mr. Tromble was, at the time of his death, or had lately been, one of the Justices of the Peace in this town.
Lake Superior News, 23 Jun 1848, vol. 3 no. 6, p. 2

BURDICK;

DEATH OF WILLIAM BURDICK
William Burdick, son of S. Burdick, died at three o'clock yesterday morning from the effects of injuries received Thursday morning while attempting to leap aboard the steambarge Pringle at the Union dock. Burdick was employed by Osborn Bros., ice and milk dealers, and in his eagerness to secure the boat's trade he jumped from the dock to the boat while she was moving toward the wharf. Miscalculating the distance he fell and was caught between the dock and the side of the boat and severely crushed in the region of the abdomen. He was a young man highly esteemed by all who knew him. Funeral will take place tomorrow at half past one from the house. All friends are invited.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 11 Aug 1888, p. 1

BURNETT;

CITY BREVITIES
Eliza, the bright little daughter of David Burnett, died of diphtheria and a private funeral from the home was held last Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Burnett have the sympathy of all their friends in their sorrow.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 4 Aug 1888, p. 1


~C~

CALBACK;

RESOLUTIONS OF CONDOLENCE
Golden Eagle, L.O.L., No. 328, L.O.T., U.S.A., Bay Mills, Mich.
Whereas it has pleased the Almighty and Supreme Ruler of the universe in His infinite wisdom to remove from among us our worthy and esteemed brother, James Calback; and, whereas the long and intimate relation held with him in the faithful discharge of his duties in this fraternal order makes it eminently befitting that we record our appreciation of him. Therefore resolved: That the wisdom and ability which he has exercised in the aid of our fraternity by service, contributions and counsels will be held in grateful remembrance. Resolved: That the sudden removal of such an honorable life from our midst leaves a vacancy and a shadow that will be deeply realized by the brethren and friends of this fraternity and will prove a serious loss to our above mentioned lodge.
Resolved: That with the deepest sympathy with the bereaved relatives of the deceased we express our hope that even so great a loss to us all may be over-ruled for good by Him who doeth all things well.
Resolved: That a copy of these resolutions be written on the records of our order and a copy printed in the local papers and copy forwarded to the bereaved family.

John Kenney
Robert Agnew
Fred Holloway
Committee on Resolutions
Soo Democrat, 5 January 1899, p. 4

CARNEY;

SATURDAY'S DEATHS
Irene Mary, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Carney, died Saturday afternoon at the home of her parents, 433 Ridge street. The funeral was from St. Mary's church Monday afternoon; interment being in the Catholic cemetery.
Soo Democrat, 12 January 1899, p. 8

CASSELS;

ACCIDENT ON LAKE SUPERIOR
We learn from Maj. J.B. Campbell that a young man named C.D. Cassells was lost overboard from the schooner "Ocean," on the evening of the 25th ult., during the passage of that vessel from Eagle Harbor to Isle Royale. A sudden flaw of wind it seems struck the boat, which shifted the boom so suddenly as to strike Mr. C. and precipitate him in the Lake. Every exertion was made to save him, but the night being dark and the weather rough, all efforts were in vain. Mr. Cassells was about 30 years of age -- was formerly from New York, and had spent the last winter in Detroit.
Lake Superior News, 4 Sep 1847, vol. 1 no. 22, p. 2.

CLOUGH;

HE TOOK LAUDANUM
Last Wednesday afternoon Richard Clough committed suicide at the Pacific Hotel by taking laudanum. Mr. Clough was well known in the city. He was engaged for the year past until three weeks ago with Carkin Stickney & Cram who have the contract for the government work here. About three weeks ago he quit the firm and has since resided in the Canadian Soo. He came over Wednesday morning to take the Minnie M. for St. Ignace where he had secured employment. He missed the boat and was waiting to take the Soo City. His wife visited him in the afternoon at his room in the Pacific House and found him badly under the influence of the drug. She immediately hastened for Dr. Ennis, but death arrived before the physician did. A post mortem examination was made by Dr. Ennis who found many evidences of disease about his organization, to relieve himself from the pains of which, he probably took poison.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 4 Aug 1888, p. 1

COTA;

LOCAL
Mrs. Julia Cota died Thursday morning at her home on Spruce street at the age of 34 years. She is survived by her husband William Cota. The funeral occured Saturday morning from St Mary's church and the remains were taken to Garden River, Ont., for enterment [sic].
Soo Democrat, 12 January 1899, p. 6


~D~

DANSKIN;

CITY BREVITIES
The funeral of little Allie Danskin, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Danskin, occured Monday morning. The services were held in the Presbyterian church.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 9 June 1888, p. 8

DEAN;

A SAD DEATH
The death of George A. Dean which occurred last Tuesday was one which came with startling effect upon his many school mates and friends. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Dean. He was at play as usual last Saturday, and Sunday started to Sunday school but feeling unwell returned home. His condition grew rapidly worse and he died Tuesday morning with congestion of the brain. He was a bright warm-hearted boy and highly thought of by all who knew him. He was fifteen years and two months old at the time of his death, and a member of the fifth grade in the high school. The funeral occurred Thursday afternoon at the Methodist church, the Rev. Cassler conducting the services. The fifth grade of the high school, under the direction of Prof. Murray, attended the services in a body.


A voice is heard on earth of kinfolks' weeping,
The loss of one they love —
But he is gone where the redeemed are keeping
A festival above.

The mourners throng the way, and from the steeple
The funeral bells toll slow —
But on the golden streets the holy people
Are passing to and fro.

And saying as they pass, Rejoice, another
Long-waited-for has come;
The Saviour's heart is glad, a younger brother
Has reached the Father's home.

I heard the angels singing
As they went up through the sky,
A sweet child's spirit bringing
To it's Father's home on high.
Happy one so soon ascended,
With thy shining raiment on,
Happy one whose race is ended
With a crown so quickly won.
— A FRIEND

We desire to return thanks to the friends of the city who so kindly gave comfort in the bereavement sustained in the death of our son, and especially are we grateful to Rev. Mr. Cassler, David Brown, J. T. Moore, Prof. Murray, the Misses Ripley and the choir of the Methodist church.
— Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Dean
Sault Sainte Marie News, 25 Feb 1888, p. 1

DORAN;

DIED
In this place May 7th, Mary Ann, youngest daughter of Samuel Ward, aged 8 months.
In this place on the 12th inst. of apoplexy, John Doran, aged 49.
Lake Superior News, 15 May 1850, vol. 1 no. 2, p. 2.


~E~

ESDELL;

DIED
In this village, October 27th, after a short illness, Mr. Alexander C. Esdell, aged twenty-five years, the deceased was formerly a resident of Detroit.
Lake Superior Journal, 27 Oct 1852, vol. 3 no. 24, p. 2.


~F~

FLEMING;

CITY BREVITIES
Willie Fleming, son of John Fleming, is lying very near death from compression of the brain, caused by a horse stepping on his h[ead] last Saturday. Dr. Rundle is attending him and everything possible is being done to relieve the unfortunate little sufferer.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 24 Mar 1888, p. 1

CITY NEWS
Little Johnny Fleming died Sunday.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 31 Mar 1888, p. 1

CARD OF THANKS
We desire to tender our sincere and heartfelt thanks to those kind and sympathizing friends who so nobly came to our assistance during the dark hours surrounding the illness and death of our beloved little Willie. May they never know sorrow.
— Mr. and Mrs. John Fleming
Sault Sainte Marie News, 31 Mar 1888, p. 8

FLYNN;

BODIES FOUND
The bodies of Dr. Prouty and Messrs. Riches and Flynn, who were drowned at this place while attempting to descend the Rapids, on the 10th ult., were found during the last week -- the former having been discovered on Topsail Island by a party of soldiers, and the others by a couple of Indians some ten or fifteen miles below. The body of Dr. Prouty will be forwarded to Ohio in the fall.
Lake Superior News and Mining Journal, 10 Jul 1847, vol. 1 no. 16, p. 2.

FOSTER;

PIONEER IS GONE
Hugh Foster Made Trip Across Atlantic In One of Old Sailing Ships

Hugh Foster died at his home on Sugar Island Saturday morning at the age of 86 years. The funeral took place today from the home, internment being on the Island.

The deceased was one of the pioneer residents of Chippewa County, coming here 56 years ago and settling on Sugar Island, where he continued to reside until his death.

He was born in Scotland and at an early age was engaged by the Hudson Bay Fur Company as its shoemaker at James Bay. The trip across the ocean to the James Bay station was made in an old sailing vessel and several weeks were committed in making the trip, severe storms which threatened to wreck the ship being encountered during the voyage.

Mr. Foster remained with the Company for ten years, the time for which he was originally engaged, when he came to the Soo and from here he went to the Island. Up to 1887 when the South Shore Line was extended to the Soo, Mr. Foster had never seen a railroad train and it is said that he had never been 5 miles from home since he settled in this county.

His wife died several years ago, but he is survived by a number of children and grandchildren, residents of the county, among whom is a son Capt. George Foster of this city.
Sault Ste. Marie Evening News, 5 February 1911

[Contributed by Barbara Halloran.]

FOURNIER;

Matilda Fournier (nee Plante)
Mrs. Mathilda Fournier One of the Sault's oldest residents.

Mrs. Mathilda Fournier, 70, died at her home at 820 South Street Sunday, June 12, 1932, at 12:30 a.m., after a life-long residence here. Death was the result of cancer.

Mrs. Fournier was born here Sept 14, 1861, and married Thomas Fournier, in the Sault. She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Reginald Barr of Detroit, and Mrs. Harriet Randall of the Sault and by four sons, David and Joseph of Detroit, and Leo and Fred of the Sault. She was a member of the St. Mary's Church.

Funeral services will be held at the St. Mary's Church Wednesday morning at 8:30. Burial will be in Riverside cemetery.
Sault Ste. Marie Evening News , 13 June 1932
Submitted by

FRITZELL;

CITY BREVITIES
Edward Fritzell, about whom very little can be learned, dropped dead in a chair in Clark's "Hub" saloon, on Water street, Saturday evening. Fritzell had been drinking heavily. He is said to have been a watchman at Cascade mine. Dr. O'Neil was called, but too late. Supposed heart disease.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 9 Jun 1888, p. 4


~G~

GABRIEL;

Marie Catherine Sobraro Gabriel
Called To Her Reward
Unexpected Death of Mrs. Catherine Gabriel Sunday Afternoon

Mrs. Catherine Gabriel, widow of the late N. V. Gabriel, died at her resident on Court street, Sault Ste Marie, MI last Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, after but a short illness. The immediate cause of her death was cholera morbus. Mrs. Gabriel had been in poor health for some time, suffering from heart trouble. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Sobraro, and was born here in March 1855, and consequently was a little over 40 years old at the time of her demise. The deceased was a prominent member of St. Mary's church and here death is universally regretted. She has always lived at the Soo. The funeral, which occurred Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock from that church, was largely attended. The Rev. Frs Donovan and Baxter conduct services, after which the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery on the hill. Undertaker Blake had charge of the funeral. The pallbearers were Seraphim LaLonde, Capt. Fred. Trempe, Capt., Wm. Greenough, John F. Moloney, Thos. Ryan and Capt. Thor. Ermatinger.
By the death of Mrs. Gabriel five children are rendered orphans three boys, George, Joseph and Victor, and two girls, Maggie and Agnes. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire, community in their sad affliction
Undated clipping
Submitted by gmglory@ejourney.com

Nicholas Victor Gabriel - January 4, 1890
A Sudden Death
Nicholas Victor Gabriel Dies at Mt. Clemens, MI
He was a well man a week ago. A useful life cut short in its very prime.
One of the Soo's Best Known Citizen is Removed from Earth Without a Particle of Warning

Nicholas Victor Gabriel is dead of complications of brain and typhoid fever. He breathed his last on Tuesday afternoon at the Kendrick House, Mt. Clemens. The funeral was announced to occur at 8:30 o'clock this morning, from St. Mary's church, the remains to be interred at the Catholic cemetery, under the auspices of the Catholic Mutual Benevolent Association, of which he was a much-loved member....

He was on a train to meet his children at Windsor, ONT.... N. V. Gabriel was one of the Soo's most solid and most popular business men. Sauer's illustrated atlas of this city contains the following highly complimentary allusion to him: "Since the early settlements in Canada, France has sent but few of her sons to this side of the world and of those few one of the most genial and enterprising is N. V. Gabriel." He was born August 24, 1853, at Petit Unquin, Department of the Moselle, Lorraine. He reached Detroit in 1872, but soon gravitated to this place, reaching here in 1874, at first manufacturing carriages and wagons. Nine years ago he commenced dealing in furniture and by his thrift and enterprise he has kept his establishment at the front. He added to this undertaking, of which he is an expert.....
In 1874 Mr. Gabriel married Miss Kate Sobraro, daughter of Frank Sobraro. Mrs. Gabriel and five bright children, three girls and two boys survive him
Undated
Submitted by gmglory@ejourney.com

GODFREY;

DIED
In this village on the 30th inst., Edward Martin, youngest son of George C. Godfrey, aged 4 years and 10 months.
Lake Superior Journal, 30 Oct 1850, vol. 1 no. 26, p. 2.

GUN;

CHIPPEWA CHIEF DEAD (Squaw Gun) - 1903
Hosted by the Chippewa County Genealogical Society


~H~

HEALY;

DEATH OF A PIONEER RESIDENT (Martin Healy)
Hosted by the Chippewa County Genealogical Society


~K~

KAWBAWGAM;

DEATH OF CHIEF CHARLEY KAW-BAW-GAM
Hosted by the Chippewa County Genealogical Society


~L~

LALONDE;

DEATH OF JOHN LALONDE.
John LaLonde, son of Frank LaLonde, died at his home on Cedar street last Saturday of consumption, aged 15 years. The deceased had been sick for two years. The funeral occurred Monday morning at 8 o'clock from St. Mary's church.
Sault Ste Marie News, May 30, 1891, Page 2
Submitted by gmglory

DEATH OF MRS. W. J. LALONDE
The remains of Mrs. Millie LaLonde, wife of William J. LaLonde, who died at Carondelet, Mo., arrived in the city Tuesday and were interred Wednesday. The death of Mrs. LaLonde was sudden and unexpected. She leaves a husband and three children. Mrs. Lalonde possessed a kind and lovable disposition and made friends of all who knew her. Relatives have the sympathy of all their friends.
Sault Ste. Marie News, October 29, 1892, Page 12
Submitted by gmglory

FRANK LALONDE
Frank Lalonde, of Cedar street, died Tuesday of consumption, and was buried on Thursday. Young Seraphine Lalonde, of the same family, is not expected to live.
Sault Ste. Marie News, April 28, 1894, Page 11
Submitted by gmglory

DEATH OF MARY OLIVE ADELAIDE LALONDE FROM CONSUMPTION
The angel of death lightly passed his hands over the fair brow of Olive Lalonde Tuesday morning at 7 o'clock and her spirit winged its flight to that bourne form whence no traveller e'er return. Mary Olive Adelaide Lalonde was the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Seraphim Lalonde, who are among the oldest and most highly respected resident of Sault Ste. Marie. Fourteen months ago Miss Olive was taken ill, but it was only a short time since that her disease, dreaded consumption, manifested itself----------was born here March 26, 1870, and was therefore nearly 26 years of age. At the time of her death, father and mother, her sisters, Mesdames C. H. Pease and Godfrey Deziel, and her brother H. J. and Wm. Lalonde were at her side.

The funeral obseques took place from St. Mary's Church Thursday morning at 9:30 o'clock the Fr. D. Donovan officiating------J. E. Lalonde a brother of the deceased living in Ishpeming arrived in the city Tuesday morning to attend the funeral.
Sault Ste. Marie News, November 23, 1895, Page 19
Submitted by gmglory

DEATH OF MRS. ALFRED POLIQUIN (Jessie Olive Lalonde)
Mrs. Alfred M. Poliquin died Sunday morning, age 18 years, of consumption. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lalonde, and had been married two years. The funeral occurred Tuesday morning from St. Mary's church, and was largely attended. Rev. J. J. Connolly conducted the impressive ceremonies.
Sault Ste. Marie News, Saturday, April 10, 1897, Part 1 Page 8
Submitted by gmglory

Frank, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lalonde, died Monday. The funeral occurred Wednesday afternoon from St. Mary's church.
Sault Ste. Marie News, Saturday September 3, 1898, Page 7
Submitted by gmglory

Mr. Frank Lalonde died last evening at 8 o'clock.
Sault Ste. Marie News, Saturday, February 18, 1899, Page 8
Submitted by gmglory

DEATH OF LITTLE JENNIE LALONDE
Jennie, the three-month-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph LaLonde, died early Thursday morning. The funeral services were held yesterday afternoon from St. Mary's church and the interment was made in Maple Ridge cemetery.
Sault Ste. Marie News, Saturday, June 17, 1899, Page 8
Submitted by gmglory

LA MOND;

CITY BREVITIES
A child of Mr. La Mond, who resides on the corner of Court street and Easterday avenue, died of diptheria Thursday, and Dr. Floyd says no report of the same was made to the health office. There have been several such deaths concealed, says the health officer, and he warns physicians that there is a fine of $100 for such an offense.
Sault Ste Marie News, 30 Jun 1888, p. 8

LAPONCE;

AN INDIAN MURDERED
Peter Cadotte, a half-breed Indian, was brought down in the Manhattan, on her last trip, in charge of an officer, for the purpose of being lodged in jail at this place, charged with the murder of Auguste La Ponce, a half-breed. It appears from the testimony at the examination that they were both intoxicated in their lodge at Marquette, on the 9th inst. and, in an altercation respecting the fire, Mr. Cadotte caught up a stick of wood and struck Mr. La Ponce on the head, and immediately after struck him several times with an axe, causing his immediate death.
Lake Superior Journal, 22 Oct 1851, vol. 2 no. 23, p. 2.

LATHWELL;

A TRIPLE TRAGEDY
Wm. Lathwell Shoots Wife, Paramour and Himself
Former Sooite Crime
Mrs. Lathwell (Addie Piquette) Dies From Her Wounds
A Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Piquette and Had Lived Here Until Two Months Ago
A terrible tragedy was enacted at Niagara Falls last Monday, in which people well known here were the participants. Wm. Lathwell, in a moment of insane rage, shot and fatally wounded his wife and a woman named Mrs. Toomey, who was his paramour, and himself. Mrs. Lathwell is dead, and her body will reach the Soo today for burial. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mars. Antoine Piquette, old residents of the Soo, and has three sisters and two brothers in the city. The ill fated woman married Lathwell two years ago this winter, when he was the proprietor of a barber shop at the Canadian Soo. The following summer Lathwell worked in a barber shop under Condolon's shoe store, and is remembered by many here - - - - -
[quite a story] continues at RootsWeb WorldConnect Project.
Sault Ste. Marie News, Saturday March 19, 1898, Page 1
Submitted by gmglory

The remains of Mrs. Wm. Lathwell who was murdered by her husband at Niagara Falls, arrived here Saturday. The funeral was held at St. Mary's church Sunday afternoon and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.
Sault Ste. Marie News, Saturday March 26, 1898, Page 2
Submitted by gmglory

LAUNDERVILLE;

MRS. ADELAIDE LAUNDERVILLE
Word was received in this city today of the death in Detroit at 8 o'clock Sunday morning of Mrs. Adelaide Launderville, age 80. The cause of death is taken to be old age. The body will arrive in the Soo at noon Tuesday, and will be taken to the Ryan & Newhouse chapel for short services before burial. Miss Agnes Gabriel of this city is a niece of the deceased. Mrs. Launderville was born in Sault Ste. Marie and was one of the first inhabitants.
Sault Ste Marie ((MI) Evening News Oct 1917
Submitted by

MRS. ADELAIDE LAUNDERVILLE
Mrs. Adelaide Launderville was born at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. Aug 16, 1837. She was 80 years of age at the time of her death. She was a daughter of the late Francis Sobraro, and lived in this city until two years ago when she moved to Detroit. She is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Charles Pratt of Detroit, Mrs Esther Peacock, and Mrs John Vernon of Chicago; three daughters; Mrs. Maria J. Ufland, Mrs. Charles Seymour and Mrs. Ethan Kibby; two brothers; Frank and Joh Sobraro. Mrs Launderville died at Detroit Suday morning after an illness of two months. the remains were accompanied here by Mrs. Ufland and daughter Leone. Services were held at St. Mary's church this morning at 8:30 and interment made at Riverside. Requiem high mass was sung by Fr. Wexter, assisted by Fathers Stenglein and Remier.
Sault Ste Marie((MI) Evening News Oct 1917
Submitted by

Mrs. Fabian Launderville, who lived here for many years, but who moved to Cleveland a year ago with her family, died at that place Monday. Soo friends extend sympathy to the sorrowing relatives.
Sault Ste. Marie News, February 20, 1892, Page 8
Submitted by gmglory

FRANK LAUNDERVILLE

LAUNDERVILLE IS TAKEN BY DEATH
SERGEANT OF POLICE SUCCUMBS TO PARALYSIS ATTACK
VETERAN OF FORCE
SERVED IN CUBAN CAMPAIGN

A stroke of paralysis suffered a week ago Wednesday evening since which time he has been unable to speak or use his body; resulted in the death of Frank Launderville, sergeant of police, at his home on 704 Bingham avenue last night at 7:20 o' clock. Mr. Launderville was widely known in the city as well as the county and has a host of friends who will mourn his death. He was 52 years old and during his life made the Soo his home. He was the veteran of the present police force, having been in the service about 17 years. Two years prior to his enlistment in Company G, Third infantry, United States Volunteers, he was a member of the Soo's police force. At the outbreak of the Spanish-American war in 1898 Company G was ordered to Cuba. While there Mr. Launderville was attacked with the Cuban malaria fever and was taken immediately back to the army hospital in New York. Here he lay at deaths door for a period of about eight weeks. This was a severe blow to his physical condition, which physicians declare was responsible for his later ill health.

REINSTATED UPON RETURN.

Upon his return to this city he was reinstated in the police department and was one of the first men to see service under the commission which was first organized about 15 years ago. His death leaves but one member of the present force who entered the service when the commission was organized, this being Patrolman Adam Haller. For the past few years he was acting truant officer appointed by the commission, and was considered one of the best and most efficient officers in the service. Mr. Launderville has been in ill health for some few years previous to his death, having suffered a light stroke of paralysis about two years ago. Last fall he was in the Ann Arbor hospital for several weeks where he received treatment. He is survived by his wife, three sisters and a mother. His sisters are; Mrs. E. W. Kibby, Portland, Oregon; Mrs. Charles Seymour and Mrs. M. J. Ufland, both of this city, his mother, Mrs. Peter Launderville resides with her daughter, Mrs. M. J. Ufland. The funeral will be held from St. Mary's church on Tuesday morning at 9 o' clock and interment will be made in Riverside cemetery. Members of Company G and the police department will attend the funeral. As a mark of respect, the city hall flag is today flying at half mast. (Block 5 Section 2 next to his wife 1st Esther, but no headstone was ever placed)

Sault Ste Marie [MI] Evening News June 1914

LYONS;

CITY BREVITIES
A memorial service for Miss Virginia Lyons will be held at the Presbyterian church tomorrow at the usual morning service hour.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 4 Feb 1888, p. 8

MEMORIAL SERVICES
THE LIFE OF MISS VIRGINIA LYON KINDLY REMEMBERED
A memorial service for Miss Virginia Lyon who died at Los Angelos Cal., on the 22nd day of December, was held at the Presbyterian church last Sabbath at the regulat hour of morning service. The church was filled with those who came to sympathize with the mourning family, and to pay respect to the memory of the deceased. Miss Lyon spent her lifetime with the exception of about five years in this place. She spent one year at the State Normal School at Ypsilanti, the following year at Ann Arbor, and one winter was spent in the South. All who knew her gave her their love and esteem. The salesmen from the store of Prenzlauer Bros. where Miss Lyon, the past summer occupied the position of cashier, attended the service in a body. Her last work was done in this position. The Presbyterian choir rendered the musical part of the service, the solo, "He is There" sang by Mrs. Otto Fowle, being especially touching and comforting.

The Rev. H. P. Cory preached the sermon from Job 34:29 "When He giveth quietness, who then can make trouble." After a brief reference to Miss Lyon's life and character, the pastor proceeded to discuss "The Unassailable Peace of God" as the theme suggested by the text, showing that this was true because of "The Mighty Power of God," "The Pledges by which that Peace is secured," and "The Circumstances in which that Peace may be Possessed." Under the latter head the practical worth of the truth contained in the text to the dying and the mourning was dwelt upon. Quite lengthy extracts from a letter giving the details of Miss Lyon's death and burial were read as showing that the promise was fulfilled in her case. The sorrowing friends were commended to a divine trust as the means by which a divine peace would be obtained even in the darkest hour.

The following are portions of the letter above referred to, written by Miss Lyon's aunt, Miss Handy, who was with her at the time of her death: "Her mind was perfectly clear. * * * She passed away so quietly. Spoke not five minutes before. * * * 'O if I could only rest' and 'I am so tired' were remarks she made. She put her arms around my neck and kissed me. In a few moments she was gone. * * * We selected a lot on the brow of a hill with a fine view of the beautiful mountains and the country. * * * Roses, Smilax, and heliotrope were beautifully arranged around her. I placed a bunch of roses at her throat. The spray tied with scarlet silk was laid carelessly to one side; the one tied with white thread was taken from the bunch tied at her throat; the one with brown silk by her hand. The simlax [sic] was twined just above her head. Those were taken out, before the casket was closed, to be sent to you. The other roses and spray of pepper were picked up at her grave. * * * Everyone remarked 'how beautiful she was' — all so easy and restful — as we followed her to the home on the hill. Her grave was lined with pepper branches and roses — the path was strewn with them, and as she was lowered she sank amidst a bed of flowers. There were a great many cut flowers sent in and all with the exception of these sent to you remained to be placed [on] the grave. [She lies] in a summer land of flowers, in as loving a spot as can be found in the world, where no chilling winds of winter can reach her, no snow to clothe her in white, nothing but the bright beautiful sun, the flowers, and the birds the year round, and she is resting, she will not be tired any more — no more suffering — and Papa, Willie, Kittie, Ida and Virginia are all together. Our sorrow should be for those who are left, not for her."
Sault Sainte Marie News, 11 Feb 1888, p. 7


~M~

MCGREGOR;

CITY BREVITIES
Mr. and Mrs. Duncan McGregor's little girl, twenty-two months old, died yesterday morning at five o'clock. The funeral will take place from the Presbyterian church at the usual hour for morning service tomorrow.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 2 Jun 1888, p. 1

MCPHERSON;

DASHED TO DEATH
Terrible Fate of John D. McPherson - Fell from a new lock gate and alighted on the flooring 46 feet below. He was picked up unconscious and died a short time after the accident.

John D. McPherson
World Champion Shot-Putter
John D. "Jack" McPherson
1865-1895

Another terrible accident occurred at the new lock shortly after 9 o'clock yesterday when John D. McPherson, one of the world's well known athletes and shot-putters, fell from one of the lower gates and landed on the lock floor 46 feet below. He was picked up by men employed on the work, and was found to be in a dying condition. He was removed to the boarding house of Miss McGregor on Ferris Street, and Dr. B. D. Harison was summoned. Upon examination no broken bones were found, but as he alighted on his head and shoulders the skull was badly injured and numerous internal injuries were also sustained. Mr. McPherson remained unconscious until 1:10 o'clock in the afternoon, when he died.

Yesterday morning Mr. McPherson left his boarding house to visit some acquaintances on the lock work. He crossed safely over both the gates of the old and new lock, talked with several of his friends, who noticed that "Jack," as he was familiarly known, had been drinking and advised him on his return not to cross over the gates but to walk around. He did not heed the warning, and started over the gates. When near the south end he lost his balance and fell off. In his descent he struck part of the staging, which broke his fall to some extent but not enough to save him.

John D. McPherson, as his name signifies, was of Scotch parentage. He was 30 years of age, and has held the world's medal for champion shot-putting for several years. He has met the best men in his particular line from all over the world and defeated them. He visited Scotland and England on more than one occasion and always returned to American with newly won medals. Mr. McPherson had a wide acquaintance and made friends wherever he went. His untimely fate is regretted by all.

The funeral will be held from the residence of J.K. McGregor on Ferris Street at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon, and the remains will be interred in Riverside Cemetery. A father, three sisters and three brothers survive the deceased.
Sault Ste Marie News, 5 Oct 1895, p. 1
Submitted by Beverly Knoll
Note by submitter: John D. McPherson was born in Canada in 1865 to Alexander and Christina McKenzie McPherson. At the time of his death, McPherson was the champion shot-putter of the world.

McSWEENEY;

ANOTHER OLD SETTLER GONE
OWEN MCSWEENEY PASSED AWAY MONDAY, AGED 87 YEARS
Owen McSweeney, one of the first settlers of Pickford Township, died at his home in Stirlingville on Monday at the ripe old age of 87 years. Mr. McSweeney was born in Ireland in 1824, and came to this country and settled here when this was almost an unbroken forest. He was well liked and respected by all who knew him for his kind acts and benevolent characteristics. He is survived by a widow and two sons, John and James, both of this community. Several children have preceded the father to the grave. The funeral services were held from the Donaldson Catholic Church, of which the deceased was a devout member, yesterday morning at 10:30 o'clock and burial was in the cemetery at that place.
Pickford Clarion, Thursday, October 5, 1911
Submitted by Aaron McSweeney

MCSWEENEY FUNERAL
Funeral services for John McSweeney, prominent Pickford Township farmer who died last Saturday were held this morning at the Barbeau Catholic Church. Burial was at the Donaldson Cemetery.

Mr. McSweeney had been failing in health for two years and his death resulted from a complication of diseases. He is survived by his widow, on the farm near Stirlingville; two sons Eugene and William both of Sterlingville and one daughter Mrs. Nellie Fallon of Schenectady, New York. He also leaves a brother James McSweeney of the Sault.

Coming to this country when a youth Mr. McSweeney established a farm near Pickford. His farm was one the largest and most modern in the county and he was widely known.
The Evening News, March 7, 1928, p. 8
Submitted by Aaron McSweeney


~N~

NEWCOMB;

DIED
In this village on Saturday, the 21st inst., Franklin Newcomb, in the 41st year of his age.
Lake Superior Journal, 25 Aug 1852, vol. 3 no. 15, p. 3.


~O~

OLMSTEAD;

CITY BREVITIES
Mrs. Rhoda Olmstead, who formerly resided at the Soo, died at Detour last Sunday.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 30 Jun 1888, p. 8


~P~

PEARSON;

SATURDAY'S DEATHS
After a long illness, Stephen Pearson died last Saturday at the Hotel Belvidere, aged 72 years. The funeral occured Monday afternoon at 1:30 from the Congregational church, Rev. F. Bagnall officiating. The interment was in the Riverside cemetery. Mr. Pearson was a native of England, but removed to the United States with his parents at the age of eleven years, settling in the state of New York. Later he located in the Canadian Soo of which town he was a long respected citizen. He was the father of Mrs. J. S. Burchill, of this city. Mr. Pearson leaves an aged wife who has the sympathy of the community in her sorrow.
Soo Democrat, 12 January 1899, p. 8

PIQUETTE;

A TRIPLE TRAGEDY
Wm. Lathwell Shoots Wife, Paramour and Himself
Former Sooite Crime
Mrs. Lathwell (Addie Piquette) Dies From Her Wounds
A Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Piquette and Had Lived Here Until Two Months Ago
A terrible tragedy was enacted at Niagara Falls last Monday, in which people well known here were the participants. Wm. Lathwell, in a moment of insane rage, shot and fatally wounded his wife and a woman named Mrs. Toomey, who was his paramour, and himself. Mrs. Lathwell is dead, and her body will reach the Soo today for burial. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mars. Antoine Piquette, old residents of the Soo, and has three sisters and two brothers in the city. The ill fated woman married Lathwell two years ago this winter, when he was the proprietor of a barber shop at the Canadian Soo. The following summer Lathwell worked in a barber shop under Condolon's shoe store, and is remembered by many here - - - - -
[quite a story] continues at RootsWeb WorldConnect Project.
Sault Ste. Marie News, Saturday March 19, 1898, Page 1
Submitted by gmglory

The remains of Mrs. Wm. Lathwell who was murdered by her husband at Niagara Falls, arrived here Saturday. The funeral was held at St. Mary's church Sunday afternoon and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.
Sault Ste. Marie News, Saturday March 26, 1898, Page 2
Submitted by gmglory

PLANT;

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Plant mourn the loss of their daughter Barbara, who died Sunday of pleurisy.
Sault Ste Marie (MI) Evening News, 15 February 1896, p. 1
Submitted by

PROUTY;

BODIES FOUND
The bodies of Dr. Prouty and Messrs. Riches and Flynn, who were drowned at this place while attempting to descend the Rapids, on the 10th ult., were found during the last week -- the former having been discovered on Topsail Island by a party of soldiers, and the others by a couple of Indians some ten or fifteen miles below. The body of Dr. Prouty will be forwarded to Ohio in the fall.
Lake Superior News and Mining Journal, 10 Jul 1847, vol. 1 no. 16, p. 2.


~R~

RAEBURN;

MRS. WILLIAM RAEBURN
Mrs. Wm. Raeburn of 212 Brady street, died at Collingwood, Ontario, Saturday, July 2nd, where she had been receiving treatment for cancer for the past seven months.

Jane M. Lillie was born at Harrisburg, Pa., January 21, 1865. In 1880 she was united in marriage with William Raeburn of Nottawasaga, Ontario, at Traverse City, Michigan.

Besides her busband she is survived by three children, Mrs. [Ro]nald M. Finlayson, Anne Raeburn, and Captain Ernest F. Raeburn, all of this city, a sister, Mrs. [illegible] Sackett of Battle Creek, Michigan, and two brothers, Nelson T. Lillie of New Orleans, La., and [Simon] Lillie of Montana.

Mrs. Raeburn was a member of the Central M.E. Church.

Funeral services will be held at two o'clock, Wednesday afternoon, with burial in the Pine Grove Cemetery.
The Evening News, July 1927
Submitted by Holly Spencer

RICHES;

BODIES FOUND
The bodies of Dr. Prouty and Messrs. Riches and Flynn, who were drowned at this place while attempting to descend the Rapids, on the 10th ult., were found during the last week -- the former having been discovered on Topsail Island by a party of soldiers, and the others by a couple of Indians some ten or fifteen miles below. The body of Dr. Prouty will be forwarded to Ohio in the fall.
Lake Superior News and Mining Journal, 10 Jul 1847, vol. 1 no. 16, p. 2

RIPLEY;

[RIPLEY]
A little son of Charles Ripley died yesterday morning.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 23 Jun 1888, p. 1


~S~

SEYMOUR;

DIED
At the Baptist Mission, in this village, on the 25th inst., E.G. Seymour, Esq., aged 32 years, of inflammatory rheumatism.
A Lawyer by profession, Mr. Seymour, has for some time held the office of Collector of Customs at this port, and has been called away in the prime of life, leaving his bereaved widow and a large circle of relatives and friends to mourn his loss.
Lake Superior Journal, 26 Jun 1850, vol. 1 no. 8, p. 3.

[Funeral Sermon - E.G. Seymour]
A Funeral Sermon on the Death of E.G. Seymour, Esq., will be deliver next Sabbath Morning at half past ten o'clock, at the Baptist Mission by Rev. Mr. Andress, of Ashtabula, Ohio.
Lake Superior Journal, 26 Jun 1850, vol. 1 no. 8, p. 2.

Esther Louise Seymour, nee Launderville, died early Thursday morning, June 16, 1949, in Newberry. She was 82 years of age. She was born in Sault Ste. Marie on Aug. 25, 1867. Surviving are two sons, Clifford and Charles of Detroit, and two daughters, Mrs. Esther O'Connor and Miss Helen Seymour of Cadillac, Michigan. The body rests at the Beaulieu Funeral Home, where prayers will be said at 8 o'clock this evening. Funeral services will be held at St. Gregory's church at 9 A.M. Friday, the Rev. O'Remus officiating. The body will be shipped to Cadillac Friday afternoon and burial will be made on Saturday in Cadillac.
Sault Ste Marie (MI) Evening News June 16, 1949
Submitted by

Horace SEYMOUR died at Mrs. Ruby's boarding house, on Ridge Street,Sault Ste Marie, MI at 10 o'clock Thursday morning. The immediate cause of death was rheumatism of the heart, but for some time he had been afflicted with consumption. He was 21 years old last October and had been associated with Harvey's marine bureau for two years. He was a son of Rev. Edward Seymour, who was rector of the Episcopal church in this city in 1884. Horace Seymour was a bright young man, always attentive to his duties, and a general favourite with all who knew him. His many friends are sorely grieved at his death. Funeral services were held at the Episcopal church yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock, after which the remains were taken to the depot, followed by a large number of sorrowing friends. His brother Frank, of Newberry, was with him during his last hours, and took the body to Ashtabula Harbor, O., for interment.
"The Democrat (MI), 7 March 1891, p. 1
Submitted by gmglory@ejourney.com

SIMS;

FROM DETOUR
Died of diphtheria on the 13th inst., Anna, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sims. She was six years of age and was a sweet and pleasant child.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 4 Feb 1888, p. 2

SMITH

From The Perth Courier, Friday, June 14, 1918

Smith -- Mr. Henry J. Smith of Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. died Thursday, June 6th, at his home after a lingering illness of nearly two years from cancer. He passed away in a sleep at the end of many months of suffering, receiving all the care and comfort a father could wish for from his family through his sickness. Mr. Smith was a broad-minded man and made friends wherever he went, and was highly respected by all who knew him. He was a true friend and kind neighbor. Deceased was born near Perth 68 years ago, where he lived until 15 years ago, when he went to Sault Ste. Marie, and purchased a farm. He leaves to mourn his loss his wife, five daughters and five sons. The daughters are: Mrs. F. Bennett, Mrs. S. Halloran, Mrs. J. P. Mansfield and Miss Lucy Smith of Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., and Mrs. B. Alden of Windsor; the sons are Jas. H. and Alphonsus and Gervaise of Sault Ste. Marie, and Michael and John of Wheeler training camp, Georgia, and four brothers, Michael of Alpena, Mich., Peter of Portland, Ore., and James of Westport, and John of Perth. The spiritual bouquets were received from the following: Mr. and Mrs. C. Ranson, Mr. and Mrs. F. Bennett, Mr. and Mrs. S. Halloran, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Mansfield, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Smith, Mrs. H. Smith and Miss Lucy, Gervaise and Alphonsus Smith, Michael Smith and family of Alpena, Mich. Floral offerings were from: Mr. and Mrs. J. Mattas, Mr. Geo. Winslow, Miss Agnes Winslow, Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Ranson, Mrs. Parker and Michael Smith. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon, June 9th, to the R. C. church at Donaldson and was largely attended, interment being made in the church cemetery. The casket was carried by Messrs. J. S. Donnelly, George Winslow, Jerome Mansfield, Sydney Welsh, D. Peterkin, James Rowan.
Submitted by Jan Kasprzak

SOULIER;

CITY BREVITIES
Capt. Joseph Soulier who formerly lived at the Soo and was well-known here died at Mackinaw Island on Feb. 11. He was about 90 years of age. He was one of the early sailors of the Soo, and sailed for some time for [the] American Fur Company.
Sault Sainte Marie News, 25 Feb 1888, p. 1

STEVENSON;

DIED
In this village, on the 12th inst., after a short and painful illness, Putnam Stevenson, aged 33 years.
The deceased was from Friendship, Fond du Lac Co., Wisconsin, and leaves a wife and two children to mourn his loss.
Fond de Lac papers please copy.
Lake Superior Journal, 16 Jun 1852, vol. 3 no. 5, p. 3.

SWEENEY;

MRS. MARY SWEENEY
Mrs. Mary Sweeney, Sr., widow of the late Eugene Sweeney, Sr., passed away at the home of her son, John Sweeney, Friday morning, after a very short illness. Death was due to old age. The deceased has made her home in this locality for over forty-five years and leaves to mourn her death two sons, James and John, both of this place.
The Evening News, December 16, 1920, p. 2
Submitted by Aaron McSweeney


~T~

THIBAULT;

SATURDAY'S DEATHS
Mrs. Margaret Thibault, aged 84 years, died Saturday at the home of her son, William Thibault, at the corner of William and Tyson streets, after a long illness with rheumatism. The funeral was from St. Mary's chirch Monday morning and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.
Soo Democrat, 12 Januray 1899, p. 8

TREAT;

DROWNED IN THE RAPIDS
A party of five persons, on Sunday last, went out in the Monticello's yawl-boat at the head of the rapids and ventured so far into the wrong current that they could not row back. Finding that they could not avoid being carried down, one of the number, by the name of Treat, lately from Carp River, jumped out of the boat and made an effort to swim to the island on the Canada side, but, not having been seen since, he was undoubtedly drowned. The others escaped by clinging to the boat, which came down the ship channel without the least management, and they owe their safety to the large sized boat they were in.
Lake Superior Journal, 20 Aug 1851, vol. 2 no. 14, p. 2.

TROMBLE;

DROWNED
Wayne J. Tromble, and Phineas P. Briggs, formerly of this place, were drowned near Drummond Island, on Tuesday week. -- The boat in which they were was supposedly upset. Both were about forty years of age, and have left families residing on Drummond Island, to which place they had recently removed. Mr. Tromble was, at the time of his death, or had lately been, one of the Justices of the Peace in this town.
Lake Superior News, 23 Jun 1848, vol. 3 no. 6, p. 2.


~W~

WARD;

DIED
In this place May 7th, Mary Ann, youngest daughter of Samuel Ward, aged 8 months.
In this place on the 12th inst. of apoplexy, John Doran, aged 49.
Lake Superior News, 15 May 1850, vol. 1 no. 2, p. 2.

WARMINGTON;

DIED
In this village, on the 30th last, Benjamin Warmington, recently from England.
Lake Superior News, 4 Sep 1847, vol. 1 no. 22, p. 3.

WOOD;

DIED
In this village, on the 19th instant, James Stanley, only son of John and Matilda Wood, aged 22 months and five days.

Child! dear child! thy form is at rest,
And the mossy turf is on thy breast;
No more shall come thy voice once loved so well,
And thy eyes' bright glance, as a kindly spell;
We are parted now, thou has't passed, thou art fled,
And I weep no tears, yet I mourn for the dead.
[Com.]

Lake Superior News and Mining Journal, 26 Jun 1847, vol. 1 no. 14, p. 3.


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