Cambria Township

from the History of Hillsdale County, Michigan 1879, Everts & Abbott pp. 266 - 271)


The township of Cambria, which lies south and west of the center of the county of Hillsdale, was originally a part of the township of Fayette. In the year of 1840, the territory now covered by the present townships of Woodbridge and Cambria was set apart, and called Woodbridge. This apportionment of the territory extended, however, over a period of but one year, for the year following the present township of Cambria was formed, comprising an area of surface six miles square, and may be described as township No. 7, south of range No. 3 west.

The surface of the land is undulating, being diversified with hills and several small lakes, named successively Bear Lake, Hog Lake, Cub Lake, and a portion of Baw Beese Lake, and having no continuous stretches of level land. The soil comprises a mixture of sand, clay, and gravel, with occasionally some pieces of clay and tracts of sandy loam. It is regarded as one of the most productive towns in the county, and the average yield of its broad acres of cultivation land compares favorably with that of any other township of the same area.

Early Settlers

The following list of entries of land will indicate the early settlers in the township previous to 1838, and the section on which they located:

Section 1.- Theron Taylor, Samuel Ford, Center Lamb, J. Ford, Ingham Roberts.
Section 2.- William C. Swift, Louson G. Budlong, Theron Taylor, H. S. Platt, and G. W. Miller.
Section 3.- Julius O. Swift, Beverly Robinson, Caleb N. Ormsbee, A. Wilcox, H. Philips, B. Fowler, and H. J. Olds.
Section 4.- Oto Beall, Caleb N. Ormsbee, Cyrus Whitney.
Section 5.- Otho Beall, E. Banker, Reuben Hoar, John Morgan, John Logan.
Section 6.- H. G. Hubbard, Ira Ingalls, Jesse F. Bangs, Daniel Bangs, Gilbert Bloomer, John W. Talbott.
Section 7.- Ebenezer Raymond, Bowen Whiting, Hiram V. Weaver, Lorenzo D. Weaver, Abel Bailey, John P. Freeman.
Section 8.- Peter Gates, A. Owen, Alfred Brown, Eliphalet Gilbert, John W. Talbott, David Thompson.
Section 9.- Lyman Allyn, Noys and Wm. W. Billings, John Flint, Charles H. Carroll, Epenetus A. Reed, Henry Swisher, Ely and Harvey Hanford.
[Section 10.- ???] This number was completely skipped. -RA.
Section 11. - William Plympton, Daniel Putnam, Samuel F. Hoper, Nicholas Van Alstine, Ralph Pratt, Samuel Chandler, Charles Laumon, Warren Chaffee.
[Section 12.- ???] This number was completely skipped. -RA.
Section 13.- Silas Doty, Wilder D. Hastings, Samuel Chandler, Benjamin J. Kinyon, Charles J. Manning, Samuel Baldwin, William Dixon.
Section 14.- Benjamin Johnson, Charles H. Carroll, Epenetus A. Reed, Edwin Comstock, William Kirbey, William Taylor.
Section 15.- Ebenezer Parker, Charles H. Carroll, Epenetus A. Reed, Samuel Baldwin.
Section 16.- School lands.
Section 17.- Samuel M. Bartlett, Z. M. P. Spalding, Hiram A. Weaver, Hiram Owen, Abel Bailey.
Section 18.- Philip Day, H. H. and George C. Seelye, Pasqua P. Weaver, Charles D. Wilcox, Ira Grosvenor.
Section 19.- Susannah Comstock, Moses Willetts, H. H. and George C. Seelye, Alfred Brown, Jacob Clark.
Section 20.- Susannah Comstock, Barron B. Willits, James Ingersoll, Samuel M. Bartlett, Joseph R. Williams.
Section 21.- James Ingersoll, Samuel M. Bartlett, Joseph R. Williams, Wait Chapin, Isaac Merritt, Epenetus A. Reed.
Section 22.- Samuel M. Bartlett, Moses Brigham, Epenetus A. Reed, Ralph Pratt.
Section 23.- Davic Hudson, I. Berry, William C. Kelly, Tolbert Sparks.
Section 24.- Lewis M. Gates, Chester Stuart, Charles I. Manning, Warren Chaffee, E. G. and H. Hanford.
Section 25.- William A. Codding, Geroge W. Jermain, B. J. Kinyon, Sally Ann Falkner.
Section 26.- Silas Doty, Dwight Woodbury, W. P. Green, Irvin Camp, E. G. and H. Hanford.
Section 27.- Samuel M. Bartlett, John De Mott, Andrew Palmer, Samuel Baldwin, C. G. and H. Hanford.
Section 28.- John McDermid, Samuel M. Bartlett, Joseph R. Williams, Rollin Brigham, C. C. Jackson.
Section 29.- David Seeley, Melvin Barrett, S. M. Bartlett, Andrew F. Oliver, Gilbert Bloomer, Joseph R. Williams, Chester Stuart.
Section 30.- Lester C. Bennett, Henry P. Sartwell, Samuel Orr, Gilbert Bloomer, Jacob Clark.
Section 31.- William Duffield and W. R. Smith, Wilder D. Hastings, John W. Johnson, Ralph Pratt, H. S. Pratt, John W. Miller.
Section 32.- Lester C. Bennett, William Duffield and W. R. Smith, Charles H. Carroll.
Section 33.- John McDermid, Samuel M. Bartlett, Norman C. Baldwin, Center Lamb.
Section 34.- T. B. Van Brunt, Dwight Woodbury, A. S. and Stephen Clark, Center Lamb, John R. Willis.
Section 35.- Anthony Silsbee, Dwight Woodbury, H. S. Platt, Sarah Douglas, Joseph True.
Section 36.- Lewis M. Gates, George W. Jermain, Sally Ann Falkner, Leander Candee, Samuel Lathrop.

The first settlers on the west side were Hiram Weaver and Able Bailey, who came in 1835. The former located 100 acres on section 7 and the same number of acres on section 17. The latter located 80 acres on section 7 and 80 acres on section 17. Moses Willets also located 100 acres on section 19 in 1937. With him also came his brothers, Barron B. Willets, and Jonathan Willets. The former located 160 acres on section 20. These brothers came from Cambria, in New York State, and named their adopted home Cambria township, in memory of their early associations at the East.

Gaylor Dowd came to this township in the year 1836. The same year Warren Smith emigrated to Tecumsch, from Franklin Co., N.Y., and after remaining three years, purchased 160 acres on section 30, where he now resides. Mr. Smith retains a very vivid recollection of his pioneer experiences. Bears and wolves were abundant at that time, and it was not unusual to see the latter playing in the fields and even approaching the houses of the settlers. Later a bounty of $3 was offered for every wolf's skin, which was afterwards increased to five dollars. Deer were also plentiful, and would frequently eat with the cattle, showing no signs of timidity. They soon became pets with the family, and very seldom were any of them harmed. Wild turkeys were also occasionally seen feeding with the domestic fowls, and they also enjoyed the same immunity from the bullets of the hunter. Mr. Smith remembers traveling three days to reach and return from the nearest point where the grists were ground, and as an evidence of the "hard times" of early days, which were less a fiction than at present, he remarked that he worked three days for a bushel of potatoes, and occassionally indulged in the luxury of a dish of oysters when in Detroit, for which he paid one dollar and a half. He also paid the same price for a bushel of very poor apples.

The first frame house built in the south portion of the township was erected by Lorenzo Rice, of Cambria Mills, and the second by Warren Smith, in 1842. As late as 1839 no roads had been cut, the country being one vast wilderness, and not more than 100 acres having been cleared in the whole township. The settlers lived far apart, and frequently no white inhabitant was to be seen from one week's end to another.

In 1841 the neighborhood was visited with a calamity that caused profound sorrow in the sudden death by accident of Hiram Weaver, whose name heads this record as the earliest settler. While digging a well upon the land which he had located, the earth caved in and buried him several feet under the surface. Some hours elapsed before the debris could be removed, and long ere this life had become extinct.

The first log house south of the Willets' location was built by Samuel Orr, who came in 1837, and was the hospitable abode of many early settlers until their own simple houses were constructed. The log houses of that period were small and inconvenient and frequently two and three families occupied them at the same time. The first barn was built by Lyman Rhodes in 1838, on land at present occupied by Bani Bishop, west quarter of the township. He remembers the first township election, held April 5, 1841, at which the electors were very few in number and was about casting the first vote on this occassion, when Potter G. Card, one of the early settlers who came in the spring of 1839, from Gates Co., N.Y. and purchased 160 acres on section 8, stepped forward and claimed the privilege on account of his superior years, which was very gracefully conceded him by Mr. Hancock.

The following are the names of voters at the time: Barton Aldrich, John Fogerson, John Ferdig, Ebenezer Banker, Isaac S. Climer, Potter G. Card, Linus A. Carner, Hiram V. Weaver, Job A. Smith, Abel Bailey, Gaylor Dowd, Charles Dowd, Silas Doty, Barron B. Willets, Jonathan Willets, Andrew Westcott, Ira Mead, Jacob S. Hancock, James Wilson, Ira Brown, Alanson Van Vlack, Daniel Weaver, Samuel Orr, Warren Smith, Isaac Wheeler, Albert Dresser, Moses Willets, John I. Van Vlack, Nathan Frink, Lorenzo Rice, John Smith, B. Willard, O. Oliver, Henry Sanford, Rowland Lewis, Alex Vinicore, William Metcalf.

The following was the valuation of property in 1841: valuation of personal property, $1,635; real estate owned by residents, $10,002.80; real estate owned by non-residents, $58, 103.11; total valuation of real estate and personal property in the township, $78,640.97; total valuation of the same in 1875, $400,290.

Jacob Clark came early and located on the east side of the township. He made much progress in clearing the wild land and making a comfortable habitation for his family, as previous to 1836 he had thirty acres cleared and had erected a comfortable frame residence. Among the early settlers on the east side were Samuel Paylor, William French, William Plympton, who located forty acres on section 12; Samuel Chandler, who located 160 acres on the same section, but did not reside upon it; Warren Chaffee, who located eighty acres on section 24; Wesley Burgoyne, Levi Lane, E. G. Salisbury, John Swift, Harvey Southworth and Peter Beam.

The first sermon was preached at the house of Ira Mead, in 1839, by Rev. Mr. Burroughs. The first school-house was built in 1840 and first taught by Miss D. A. Gload, in District No. 4, on section 19. This lady died in the township in 1878, at Banker's Station. The first marriage was that of Ira Brown to Sara Wilson, which occurred at the house of James Wilson, Jan. 11, 1842. The ceremony was performed by Ira Mead, Esq., then justice of the peace. The first male child born was Noalee Bailey, Aug. 28, 1839. The first female child born was Rabie O. Weaver, Sept. 2, 1836, who lost her life in the great Chicago fire, in 1871.

The first death in the township was that of Luceene Bailey, wife of Abel Bailey, who died Feb. 22, 1837. This was a very sad and impressive event in the neighborhood.

In Feb., 1841, the government established a post office and appointed Jacob Hancock postmaster. The following is  a summary of the amounts paid the mail-carrier for the first four years, when the rates were 6 1/4 cents, 12 1/2 cents, 18 3/4 cents, and 25 cents for each piece of paper.

It gives a reading of the prices by date but is such small and poor print that I can not read it.

The mail matter was at this early date so limited that the postmaster frequently carried it in his pocket.

Cambria Mills

The most considerable village of the township of Cambria is

CAMBRIA MILLS

which was founded by John McDermid, and takes its name from the mills which were built by him. He located 120 acres on section 28 and 40 acres on section 33, June 16, 1835, and immediately began the construction of a sawmill. He was followed soon after by his brother, Andrew Jackson McDermid, who built a gristmill. These mills have during a series of years, undergone many improvements, but the original structures still exist as landmarks of the period when Cambria Mills was little more than a vast forest. When John McDermid first settled here there were no traces of civilization to be found, wood and thick underbrush covering the territory now embraced in the little village. The mills since their erection have had successive proprietors. The McDermids sold them to Lorenzo Rice, who again sold them to Wilbur & Wheeler. They passed again into the hands of the McDermids, and were afterwards controlled by one Russell and John Mangold, who sold them to James Hollingshead. Jacob Bush then purchased a half-interest and Hollingshead sold his interest to Henry Gilbert, who purchased Bush's interest and became sole owner. After conducting them for some length of time he disposed of the property to Western Ramiley, who re-sold them again to Gilbert, who is the present owner.

Cambria Mills was platted in 1878, but has never been incorporated. Among the most imposing structures is the school building, built of brick and admirably adapted by its arrangements for ventilation and comfort as well as its spacious apartments for the purpose to which it is devoted. It is the intention of the trustees during the present year to introduce the graded school system and give instruction in the higher branches, when the corps of teachers will also be increased in numbers. It is at present conducted by Mr. Samuel Morris and Miss Huldah Chapel.

The village also boasts 1 hardware-store, 2 drug-stores, 2 dry-goods stores, 1 boot-and-shoe store, 2 harness shops, 2 blacksmith shops, 1 cabinet-shop, 1 milliner-shop, 1 market and a planing-mill, owned by George F. Drake. There are 3 physicians in the place ---- James W. Niblack, Charles E. Payne and Mrs. E. S. Aber.

Among the representative men of the village is George F. Houghtby, who has for the past twenty-two years held the appointment of postmaster. He is also proprietor of the Houghtby House, which was built in the summer of 1875, and is strictly a temperance house. In fact, the termperance sentiment meets a warm indorsement from the residents of Cambria Mills, the only license in the place having been granted to one of the druggists to sell  liquors for medicinal purposes. The citizens confess with chagrin that for a brief period a whisky shop flourished in the village, "but one pleasant day the institution collapsed." While the propietor thereof --- a gentleman standing, we judge, near seven feet in his stockings --- had gone to supper, or somewhere else, the outside of this establishment, or at least a part of it, "went in," and the inside --- bottles, benches and casks --- "went out," and strange to say, in such ceremonious haste that not a bottle or cask but was so buried and broken as to lose its precious contents on the ground. Cambria now breathes pure air thank God and with her enterprising moral and intelligent citizenship, may look forward to certain prosperity and wealth.

The Methodist Episcopal Church in the village has been in existence since 1866. In that year the classes of the township desiring to have a stated place of worship within their own limits, united their forces with those of Cambria Centre and formed an organization. Soon after recognizing the necessity for a suitable house of worship, they began the erection of the present edifice, under the pastorate of Rev. Mr. Fauuer?. The building is of brick, convenient and comfortable, with ample room for a congregation of 300. Cambria Circuit includes the society at Cambria Mills, and a society four miles south, at Woodbridge. In the class at the former place are 57 members, the latter numbering 35 in its present membership. Its present pastor is Rev. Marcellus Darling.

CAMBRIA LODGE, NO. 259, OF FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS

CAMBRIA LODGE, NO. 259, OF FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS was organized Dec. 4, 1868. The members who first applied for a charter were S. L. Dart, B. W. Dodge, Christian Fink, James Hollingshead, James Fink, C. T. Gilbert, Jacob Bust, Perry Oderkirk, Lauson Fink, Elkana Brower, Jesse Hilliard, Warren Merritt, and George Farmer. The present membership of the lodge, which is in a flourishing condition, is 56. Its first officers were S. L. Dart, Worthy Master; R. W. Dodge, Senior Warden; C. Fisk, Junior Warden; James Hollingshead, Treas.; James Fink, Sec.; C.T. Gilbert, S.D.; Jacob Bush, J.D.; Perry Oderkirk, Tyler. Its present officers are P. H. Oderkirk, Worthy Master; E. Brower, Senior Warden; Charles Marsh, Junior Warden; Judson Chapel, Sec.; Christian Fink, Treas.

This township is the site of the couty-house, which is located on section 4, the farm covering portions of sections 3 and 4. Three railroads traverse the soil of Cambria ---- the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad passing through the extreme northeastern point of the township; the Fort Wayne, Jackson and Saginaw Railroad running through the northwestern portion and forming a junction with the Detroit, Hillsdale and Indiana Railroad at

BANKERS STATION

BANKERS STATION -- This little hamlet, located in the northwestern corner of Cambria, was founded by Horace and George Banker, who located there in 1838 and has derived some importance since 1873 from its railroad connections. It has a hotel, kept by John Burgess, black-smith shop, store, post office, ---W. A. Carpenter being the postmaster, --- sawmill, and a restaurant connected with the depot. There is also a repair shop for the use of the railways. The church, which is connected with the Free-Will Baptist denominaton and is also used as school building, is an unpretentious wooden structure, with nearly 200 sittings, which has been erected about four years. Its present pastor is Miss Mary Garard, who resides in Hillsdale while pursuing her studies and preaches at Bankers' on Sabbath.

STEAMBURG

STEAMBURG is a small settlement on the east side of the township, and takes its name from a steam saw and planing mill located there owned by Chauncey W. Ferris. It has also a black-smith shop, Mr. Lamb being proprietor, and school-house, and a few private houses, but no post office.

Thus we have given a brief history of one of the fairest townships that Hillsdale County boasts. With a soil remarkable for fertility, a geographical location affording it every advantage, and a population whose intelligence and moral character are universally conceded, it may with reason look forward to a continues growth and prosperity as the reward of its enterprise.

Township Officers

The following are the officers elected since the organization of the township:
1841--Jacob Hancock, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk; Ira Mead, Treasurer; Warren Smith, Collector; Job A. Smith, Samuel Orr, Barron B. Willets, School Inspectors; Potter G. Card, James Wilson, Directors of the Poor; Lorenzo Riel, Pardon Aldrich, Silas Doty, Highway Commissioners; Pardon Aldrich, Ira Mead, Samuel Orr, Lorenzo Rice, Justices of the Peace; Alanson W. Van Vlack, John Ferguson, Albert Dresser, Warren Smith, Constables.

1842--Lorenzo Rice, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk; Pardon Aldrich, Treasurer; Pardon Aldrich, Justice of the Peace; Daniel Weaver, Jacob Clark, Job A. Smith, Assessors; Alanson Van Vlack, I. P. Wheeler, Job A. Smith, Highway Commissioners; Job A. Smith, Ira Mead, Jacob Clark, School Inspectors; Potter Card, Gaylor Dowd, Directors of the Poor; Warren Smith, Albert Dresser, Henry Sanford, Constables.

1843--Lorenzo Rice, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk; Lorenzo Rice, Justice of the Peace; Pardon Aldrich, Treasurer; Jacob Clark, Barron B. Willets, Assessors; Joseph A. Smith, Isaac P. Wheeler, Moses Willets, Highway Commissioners; Samuel Orr, Job A. Smith, School Inspectors; Jacob Clark, Ira Mead, Directors of the Poor; Luther Finney, Constable.

1844--Lorenzo Rice, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk; Pardon Aldrich, Treasurer; Barron B. Willets, Jacob Clark, Assessors; Thomas H. Stewart, Alanson Van Vlack, Elijah G. Salsbury, Highway Commissioners; Barron B. Willets, School Inspector; Ira Mead, Jacob Clark, Directors of the Poor; Mesbach Terry, Alexander Vinicore, Jonathan Willets, Constables.

1845--Lorenzo Rice, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk; Jacob Clark, Justice of the Peace; Samuel Orr, Treasurer; Pardon Aldrich, Barron B. Willets, Assessors; Levi Lane, Thomas S. Thompson, Jonathan Willets, Highway Commissioners; Pardon Aldrich, Ira Mead, Directors of the Poor; Nelson Chittenden, William D. Stout, School Inspectors; Thomas Shall, Constable.

1846--Pardon Aldrich, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk; Pardon Aldrich, Justice of the Peace; Ira Mead, Treasurer; Barron B. Willets, School Inspector; Charles Burr, Frederic Van Tyle, Highway Commissioners; Oliver Walkley, Nelson Chittenden, Assessors; Ira Mead, Austin T. Stone, Directors of the Poor; Jonathan Willetts, Alexander Vinicore, Leander L. Lane, Constables.

1847--Ira Foster, Supervisor; Elijah J. Salisbury, Township Clerk; Peter Beam, Treasurer; Jacob S. Hancock, Addison H. Mack, Assessors; Alanson Van Vlack, Keith Aldrich, John Swegles, Highway Commissioners; Ira Mead, Pardon Aldrich, Directors of the Poor; William G. Foreman, School Inspector; Leander L. Lane, Daniel Chapman, Edmund Van Vlack, Horace Starkweather, Constables.

1848--Ira Mead, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk; Peter Beam, Treasurer; Lucius H. Gridley, Justice of the Peace; Alanson Van Vlack, George T. Baron, Assessors; Frederic Van Tyle, Horatio Bates, Highway Commissioners; Lucius H. Gridley, John McDermid, School Inspectors; Henry Wilcox, Almond Bird, Directors of the Poor; Lemuel Howe, Amos Marston, John Stuart, Wesley Burgoyne, Constables.

1849--Daniel Weaver, Supervisor; Ira B. Card, Township Clerk; Peter Beam, Treasurer; Calvin Smith, Wilks L. Stewart, Justices of the Peace; Jacob S. Hancock, Andrew J. McDermid, School Inspectors; E. C. Barnes, Henry Wilcox, Highway Commissioners; Christopher Brock, Director of the Poor; Jonathan Willets, Thomas S. Hall, Wesley Burgoyne, Constables.

1850--Daniel Weaver, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk; Jonathan Willets, Treasurer; Nelson Chittenden, Peter Strunk, Justice of the Peace; Henry Wilcox, Austin T. Stone, Commissioners of Highways; Barron B. Willets, John Swegles, Jr., School Inspectors; Nathan Rich, Levius A. Carner, Directors of the Poor; S. B. Paylor, Alexander Vinicore, Jonathan Willets, Richard Rice, Constables.

1851--Ira Mead, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk; Jonathan Willets, Treasurer; Richard Willets, William French, Highway Commissioners; John Lamb, Nathan Rich, Justices of the Peace; Andrew J. McDermid, William French, School Inspectors; S. B. Paylor, Lorenzo L. Lane, Thomas Hall, Russell Seaman, Constables.

1852--Daniel Weaver, Supervisor; Nathan Frink, Township Clerk; Kent Aldrich, Treasurer; Horatio W. Bates, Justice of the Peace; Jacob S. Hancock, Warren Smith, Highway Commissioners; Barron B. Willets, Ira B. Card, School Inspectors; Joseph Orr, William French, Assessors; John H. Stephens, Wesley Burgoyne, Directors of the Poor; Jeremiah Sabins, Thomas Stuart, Josiah Levitt, John H. Dunkel, Constables.

1853--Daniel Weaver, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk; Keith Aldreich, Treasurer; Wilks Stuart, Justice of the Peace; William French, Nathan Rich, Highway Commissioners; Barron B. Willets, Bari Bishop, School Inspectors; Jacob Clark, Christopher Brook, Directors of the Poor; Solomon M. Barron, Josiah Levitt, Thomas H. Stuart, Carlisle Smith, Constables.

1854--Barron B. Willets, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk; Samuel Foust, Justice of the Peace; Hubbard German, Treasurer; Barron B. Willets, Decatur Barnum, School Inspectors; John J. Cheney, Henry Wilcox, Highway Commissioners; John McDermid, Christopher Brock, Directors of the Poor; Carlisle Smith, John H. Stage, James E. Wilson, Orlando White, Constables.

1855--Andrew J. McDermid, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk;  Hubbard German, Teasurer;  Ira Mead, Justice of the Peace; Warren Smith, Calvin Smith, Highway Commissioners;  Magor Barritt, Bani Bishop, School Inspectors; Nathan Rich, Keith Aldrich, Directors of the Poor; Samuel B. Paylor, William Hanson, Jonathan Willets, William T. Fleming, Constables.

1856--William French, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk; Josiah Leavitt, Treasurer; Barron B. Willets, William G. Barnum, School Inspectors; Strickland Adams, Charles Shattuck, Highway Commissioners; Ira Mead, Justice of the Peace; Job Cole, Amos Green, Robert W. Paylor, Andrew J. Fuller, Constables.

1857--William French, Supervisor; Nathan H. Frink, Township Clerk; Wells Whitney, Treasurer; Ira Hill, Justice of the Peace; Bani Bishop, J. B. Morris, School Inspectors; Abel Wolcott, Henry Southworth, Highway Commissioners; Ira Mead, John W. Johnson, Directors of the Poor; George W. Lane, Walter R. Frink, Job Cole, David Leighman, Constables.

1858--Ira Mead, Supervisor; William S. Barclay, Township Clerk; Jonathan Willets, Treasurer; Lorenzo Russell, Justice of the Peace; Orlando White, Justice to fill vacancy; Francis Andrews, Highway Commissioner; Charles G. Robertson, School Inspector; John H. Johnson, Franklin Cook, Directors of the Poor; Job Cole, John Houghtby, George W. Lane, Constables.

1859--William French, Supervisor; William S. Barclay, Township Clerk; Levi Lane, Treasurer; Charles Shattuck, Justice of the Peace; Ira B. Card, School Inspector; Joel B. Norris, John Mead, Highway Commissioners; Peter Beam, Harvey Southworth, Directors of the Poor; George Lane, Russell Randall, Job Cole, Charles Hanna, Constables.

1860--Barron B. Willets, Supervisor; Ira Hill, Township Clerk; Perry Sebring, Treasurer; Wells Whitney, Justice of the Peace; Charles G. Robertson, School Inspector; Amos Green, Highway Commissioner; Sylvester Clark, Asa B. Hanna, Bennet Gregg, Job Cole, Constables.

1861--Barron B. Willets, Supervisor; Ira Hill, Township Clerk; Perry Sebring, Treasurer; Tibbets Nichols, Justice of the Peace; Bani Bishop, School Inspector; Ira Mead, Highway Commissioner; Geroge W. Lane, John Houghtby, Job Cole, Asa B. Hanna, Constables.

1862--Barron B. Willets, Supervisor; Ira Hill, Township Clerk; Perry Sebring, Treasurer; Richard Willets, Justice of the Peace; Orlando Parker, Justice to fill vacancy; David B. Taylor, School Inspector; Nicholas S. Adams, Commissioner of Highways; Orlando White, Andrew B. Fleming, Palmer Rowley, Geo. W. Lane, Constables.

1863--Barron B. Willets, Supervisor; Ira Hill, Township Clerk; Perry Sebring, Treasurer; Philip De Pay, Justice of the Peace; Orange Porter, Justice to fill vacancy; Bani Bishop, Joseph Arnold, School Inspectors; Amos Green, Highway Commissioner; Acander Sanders, Andrew B. Fleming, Orlando White, Geo. W. Lane, Constables.

1864--Barron B. Willets, Supervisor; Joseph Snyder, Township Clerk; Worlin C. Barritt, Treasurer; Orlando White, Justice of the Peace; Joseph Arnold, School Inspector; Ira Mead, Highway Commissioner; Andrew B. Fleming, Stephen Osborn, Geo. W. Lane, Constables.

1865--Charles G. Robertson, Supervisor; Worlin Barritt, Township Clerk; Wells Whitney, Treasurer; Tibbets Nichols, Justice of the Peace; Bani Bishop, School Inspector; John Chappell, Highway Commissioner; David Simmons, Andrew B. Fleming, William Wilson, Warren Smith, Constables.

1866--Charles G. Robertson, Supervisor; Worlin C. Barritt, Township Clerk; Wells Whitney, Treasurer; Chester Farmer, Justice of the Peace; Orange Porter, Highway Commissioner; William Wilson, Perry Sebring, Ira A. McBain, Alphonzo Sanders, Constables.

1867--Charles G. Robertson, Supervisor; Worlin C. Barritt, Township Clerk; Dennis Mead, Treasurer; Philip De Pay, Justice of the Peace; Bani Bishop, School Inspector; Ira Mead, Highway Commissioner; Charles Marsh, Ira A. McBain, Job Cole, Lewis Pierson, Constables.

1868-- Bani Bishop, Supervisor; Worlin C. Barritt, Township Clerk; Dennis W. Mead, Treasurer; Charles McDermid, School Inspector; John Chappell, Highway Commissioner for term, A. B. Prentice to fill vacancy; John McNorten, Justice of the Peace; Charles S. Marsh, Hiram M. Clark, John H. Stage, John F. Peterson, Constables.

1869--Bani Bishop, Supervisor; Charles C. McDermid, Township Clerk; Dennis W. Mead, Treasurer; George E. Ferris, Justice of the Peace; Bani Bishop, School Inspector; Orange Porter, Highway Commissioner; William A. Case, Hiram A. Clark, John H. Stage, George W. Lane, Constables.

1870--Bani Bishop, Supervisor; Worlin C. Barritt, Township Clerk; Dennis W. Mead, Treasurer; Leander Brown, Justice of the Peace; A. B. Prentice, Justice to fill vacancy; Amos Green, Highway Commissioner; Franklin Cook, School Inspector; Loren Benson, Charles S. Marsh, John H. Stage, H. M. Clark, Constables.

1871--Perry Sebring, Supervisor; Samuel Foot, Township Clerk; Avery Smith, Treasurer; John Cole, Justice of the Peace; Henry D. Baldwin, School Inspector; Job Card, Highway Commissioner; Hiram Clark, Simeon Bliss, Andrew Hall, S. C. Stage, Constables.

1872--Perry Sebring, Supervisor; James A. Chandler, Township Clerk; Avery A. Smith, Treasurer; John M. Norton, Justice of the Peace; John J. Chappell, Highway Commissioner; Charles L. Northrup, Drain Commissioner; Samuel Foot, School Inspector; Lester Baldwin, Charles March, James Fink, Nelson Benedict, Constables.

1873--Perry Sebring, Supervisor; James A. Chandler, Township Clerk; Charles Marsh, Treasurer; A. B. Prentice, Justice of the Peace; Amos Green, Highway Commissioner; Henry Baldwin, School Inspector; Charles L. Northrup, Drain Commissioner; Hiram Clark, Lester Baldwin, Nelson Benedict, John W. Cronk, Constables.

1874--Orange Porter, Supervisor; Christian Fink, Township Clerk; Charles Marsh, Treasurer; Luther B. Wolcott, Justice of the Peace; John Dryer, Highway Commissioner; James Fink, Highway Commissioner to fill vacancy; Worlin C. Barritt, School Inspector; Wells Whitney, Drain Commissioner; George Barbe, Oliver Bement, William Lathrop, Constables.

1875--Perry Sebring, Supervisor; George F. Houghtby, Township Clerk; Charles S. Marsh, Treasurer; William A. Carpenter, Justice of the Peace; Orlando White, Justice to fill vacancy; Judson D. Chappell, Superintendent of Schools; Henry D. Baldwin, Inspector of Schools; A. B. Bennett, Highway Commissioner; Amos Green, Drain Commissioner; Henry Sanders, Loren Benson, Charles Marsh, Israel N. Gregg, Constables.

1876--Perry Sebring, Supervisor; George F. Houghtby, Township Clerk; David Simmons, Treasurer; John M. Norton, Justice of the Peace; Henry Cheney, School Superintendent; Henry D. Baldwin, School Inspector; Christian Fink, Highway Commissioner; Horace Titus, Drain Commissioner; Charles S. Marsh, Orlando White, John D. Burgess, Edwin Foust, Constables.

1877--Perry Sebring, Supervisor; George F. Houghtby, Township Clerk; Charles S. Marsh, Treasurer; A. B. Prentice, Justice of the Peace; Ira Green, Highway Commissioner; Henry D. Cheney, Superintendent of Schools; D. W. Mead, Inspector of Schools; Charles Marsh, John Burgess, John French, Edd Gregg, Constables.

1878--Edwin A. Jones, Supervisor; James W. Niblack, Township Clerk; David F. Watkins, Treasurer; Marvin Jones, Highway Commissioner; Luther B. Wolcott, Justice of the Peace, David E. Chesnut, School Superintendent; Charles D. Bos, School Inspector; Horace W. Titus, Drain Commissioner; Lewis Eddy, James Dow, John G. Chesnut, Zachariah Kamp, Constables.


William S. HOSMER and Abner W. PEARCE

WILLIAM S. HOSMER and ABNER W. PEARCE.

The lives of Mr. Hosmer and Mr. Pearce have been so inseparably connnected and afford such a beautiful example of fidelity and constancy, that it is almost impossible to tell the story of one without weavng in all the essential points in the history of the other.  Both are descended from sturdy New England stock, Abner W. Pearce having been born in Torrington, Conn., Aug. 23, 1813, his parents having emigrated to that State from Rhode Island. He remained at home until his seventeenth year, and followed the occupation of a blacksmith until the removal of the family to Oneida Co., N.Y., when he became a farmer and lumberman, only occasionally pursuing his original trade. On the 11th of November, 1838, Mr. Pearce married Thankful Tuttle, who resided at Vienna, N.Y. and together followed farming pursuits. In the spring of 1844 Mr. and Mrs. Pearce moved to Hillsdale township, being accompanied by their faithful colaborers, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Hosmer. They settled upon a tract of land which had been acquired by an advantageous trade before leaving New York State.

They live in their attractive home, surrounded by every comfort that industry and perseverance has brought to them, and cheered by the presence of friends and relatives who are a part of their home circle.

Under the same hospital roof live Wm. S. Hosmer and wife. Mr. Hosmer was born in Craftsbury, Vt., May 20, 1809. At the age of five years he moved to Oneida Co., N.Y., with his parents, and aided them in farming occupations until his sixteenth year, when he learned the trade of a carpenter, which he followed until his removal to Michigan.

He married Dec. 13, 1836, Alma Tuttle, of Vienna, N.Y. She and Mrs. Pearce were the daughters of Deacon Tuttle, of that place, a man of much influence in the community in which he resided. They have had six children. Emily A. is the wife of Edwin Phelps, and resides at Hillsdale. Hiram died Nov. 9, 1868. Mary resides with her parents. Sophia died May 26, 1866. Abner P. also lives with his parents, and manages the farm. Etta is the youngest, and resides at home.

These gentlemen, with their families, have never been separated since their advent in the State of Michigan. The same roof has sheltered them, and the same lands have supplied them as abundant subsistence. A view of their fine farm-building is given in thie volume. Both Mr. Hosmer and Mr. Pearce have held several positions of trust in their township, and are known as consistent Democrats of the Jackson type.

Transcribed by Ronnie Aungst
November 2001


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