Cheboygan County MI Genealogy

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Obits/Deaths

Name Obit/Death Notice
Campbell, William Lumbermen Drowned
Cheboygan, Mich., Dec 24 - John Haws, William Campbell and Ernest Marquette, employes at McCarthy's lumber camp, while crossing the ice on Mullett Lake Sunday afternoon about twelve miles from here, broke through the ice and were drowned.
[Source: San Jose Mercury, Dec 25, 1900; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Clark, Capt John R Capt John R Clark, well known here, having been a resident of Elkhart twenty-five years ago, died at his home in Cheboygan, Mich., Friday, at 4 p. m. aged about 75 years. Jenks and Mel J Clark and Mrs Anthony Wear, all of this city, are children of the deceased. Jenks Clark left for Cheboygan this morning to attend the funeral. The wife of the deceased, Mrs Nancy Clark, died on Dec 26, last, aged 72. Mr Clark's demise soon followed, as the shock of her death was too great from him to withstand.
[Source: Elkart (IN) Weekly Review, January 16, 1901; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Cook, Elmer Tug Record Goes Down - One of the Staunchest Tugs on the Lakes Sunk in Ship Canal - Three Lives Lost
Duluth, Minn., June 3 - The tug Record, one of the Inman fleet, and one of the staunchest on the lakes, was run down and sunk in the ship canal just before midnight. Three of the tug's crew went down with their boat. They were: Captain John Bricklet, Elmer Cook, Cheboygan, steward; George Riggs, Cheboygan, engineer. The fireman, Al Davidson, was the only survivor of the tug's crew. The Record met a steamer as she entered the harbor. The strong current setting out into the lake swung the tug broadside against the steamer's stern and Record went down like a shot.
[Source: Oswego (NY) Daily Times, Jun 3, 1898; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Corrow, Mrs Its Second Victim
Mrs Corrow Killed at Bellant's Crossing Near Cheboygan
Cheboygan, April 3-At Bellant's crossing this morning Mrs Corrow, who was coming to town with a dog team driven by her young son, was struck by a train and horriby mangled. She died soon after. The boy was badly hurt, but will probably recover. At the same place George Hughes was killed a few months ago.
[Source: Grand Rapids Press, Grand Rapids MI; April 3, 1899; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Cummings, Frank Cheboygan--Frank Cummings, the 17-years-old son of a prominent farmer, fell off a log in the river and was drowned yesterday afternoon.
[Source: Saginaw (MI) News, July 4, 1900; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Darling, George Deputy Sheriff George Darling, of Cheboygan, who was found frozen to death in the woods, made a desperate attempt to light a fire, and from evidence found near the body he fired almost 100 shots to attract attention. He forded a river after a wounded deer, and a snow storm set in soon afterwards. His garments were wet, and he was an easy victim to the cold weather.
[Source: Daily Telegram (Michigan), December 3, 1897; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Davis, Cynthia Tibbits A telegram was received Saturday by Chas. A. Davis that his mother, Mrs. Col. H. G. Davis, had died at her home in Cheboygan, Mich. Mr. Davis left on the night train to attend the funeral. Cynthia Davis was the daughter of Allen Tibbits, was born in Ohio on July 2, 1822, and came with her parents to Elkhart county in 1830, settling on Two Mile Plain. Mr. and Mrs. Davis were married April 28, 1842, and they resided for many years in Jefferson township.-Goshen Times
[Source: Elkhart [IN] Daily Review, Jan 31, 1888; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Deveraux, Frank A Terrible Struggle
Both Hunter and Bear Killed in a Death Struggle in the Woods
Detroit, September 17.-The body of a man has been found in the woods eight miles from Cheboygan and identified as that of Frank Deveraux, a homesteader, who lived near that locality. The surroundings show that he was killed in a bear fight, which resulted fatally for both, as the animal's body was found near that of the dead man. Deveraux's body was in a sitting posture, braced against a log, where he had evidently placed himself after his contest with the beast. Evidences of a terrible struggle were plainly visible all about, but those on the man were most prominent, and his left side, cheek and legs had been gnawed nearly to the bone, one shoulder was dislocated, an eye gouged out, his stomach almost torn open, and marks of the bear's claws were discernable on various parts of the body. The bear had been shot through the shoulder, and, aggravated by his wound, a terrible struggle had evidently ensued, as the ground was torn up for twenty feet about the spot, and the print of the bear's teeth and bunches of hair were found on the gun Deveraux had used.
[Source: Ohio Plain Dealer, Sep 17, 1883; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Doner, Lillie Lillie Doner, the 11-year-old girl burned so badly by kerosene that her brother was playing with Monday evening at Cheboygan, died Wednesday evening from her burns. Her grandfather is suffering greatly from the burns received while trying to rescue her.
[Source: Jackson Citizen Patriot, Jackson MI; July 28, 1898; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Ehret, Leslie Blown to Atoms
Cheboygan, Mich., Sept. 30 - Three young hunters were killed in a dynamite explosion when they mistook a dynamite store house in the woods for a deserted hut and used it for a target. The dead are: Bert Simmons, 18; C. Simmons, 15 and Leslie Ehret, 18. The store house belonged to a local hardware firm and was situated about a mile from town. It contained 350 pounds of dynamite. Parts of Ehret's body was found but the other two boys were blown to atoms.
[Source: The Evening News, Sep 30, 1907; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Elliott, son of Reuben The 4-year-old son of Reuben Elliott was burned to death while playing about a fire near Cheboygan, Tuesday.
[Source: Jackson Citizen Patriot, Apr 23, 1896; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Fluery, Albert Cheboygan, Mich., Feb. 16 - Albert Fluery walked on the ice from Bois Blanc Island to this city last Saturday night to get medicine for his sick child. The mercury was 16 below zero, and a wild snow storm was raging. He set out on the return trip about midnight, with a lantern and compass to guide him. That was the last seen of him. There is little doubt that he perished, and his body was covered up by drifting snow.
[Source: Oswego (NY) Daily Times, Feb 17, 1905; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Galbraith, John John Galbraith, of Cheboygan, was killed by a big pulley which fell from his wagon.
[Source: Jackon (MI) Citizen Patriot, December 2, 1899; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Galvin, John Death of a Former Resident
From Grand Rapids (Mich.) correspondence of the "Western Home Journal", published at Detroit, we learn of the death of John Galvin, formerly of this place, which occurred at Cheboygan, Mich., on Christmas day. The remains were taken to Grand Rapids for burial. The correspondent says:

"On Tuesday evening last the mortal remains of Mr. John Galvin, who died on Christmas day in Cheboygan, arrived here via the G. R. & I. railroad, and were taken to the residence of Capt. John M'Donough, on Fitzhugh street, where throngs of Mr. Galvin's former friends and acquaintances paid their last sad respects to his memory. His funeral was held on Wednesday, from St. Andrew's church. Solemn mass of requiem was celebrated, Rev. J. C. Pulcher, of St. James' church, celebrant; Rev. Frank Van Antwerp, of Hastings, deacon; Rev. P. J. M'Manus, sub-deacon; Rev. T. D. Flannery, of Grattan, performing the burial services over the remains in the church. Fr. Pulcher accompanied the remains to the cemetery, where he read the burial service, assisted by Frs. Van Antwerp and Flannery. The pall-bearers, appointed by Mr. Galvin before his death from among his oldest and best friends of former happy days in Grand Rapids, were C. G. Pulcher, Frank P. M'Graw, C. Grady, L. J. Quinn, Henry P. Grady and Thos. H. Hart. A very large concourse of carriages followed his remains to their last resting place, upwards of 60 conveyances being in the sorrowful procession."
Deceased had many friends and relatives in this section, among whom is a sister, Mrs. J. D. Brooder, who resides at East Kane.
[Source: Kane (PA) Weekly Blade, January 19, 1882; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Gansmere, August Murder Near Cheboygan
Cheboygan, Sept. 10.-A cold-blooded murder was committed Saturday afternoon about three miles from this city on the track of the Mackinaw division of the Michigan Central railroad. The story as told by one of the parties concerned, who gives his name as Geo. V. Taylor, is that he and the murdered man, whose name is "Gus", were walking north on the track when they were stopped by two other men who were eating a lunch. The latter asked them for tobacco, which was given them. Then they said: "You must have money, you are so flush," and then grabbed up a rock and struck the man "Gus", his chum, on the head. While they were killing his chum he got away and ran into the woods, circled around and came out on the track, bailed a passing engine and got his dead chum aboard. They were brought here. The informed is in jail awaiting further developments. Officers with a crowd of men started out to search for the murderers. They are all tramps. It is the opinion of many that the informer is the culprit. [Source: Jackson Citizen, Sep 11, 1894]

Leaves Behind Him Letters That Admit His Crime
Cheboygan, Mich., Oct. 11.-The mystery of the murder of Gus Genesemer on the railroad three miles northwest of here six weeks ago has been cleared up. George Van Taylor, the man's chum, held as a suspect, cut his throat at the jail here and died instantly. Shortly after dinner, while Sheriff Sullivan was at court, Taylor asked for a razor to shave with, and on getting it made a remark that scared the girl, and she sent for the sheriff, but Taylor immediately went to his cell and cut his throat, nearly severing his head from his body, and was dead when the sheriff got there. Taylor left three letters, one to his relative, Phineas Dunham of Castalia, Ohio; one to his sweetheart, Nettie Abbs of Gypsum, Ohio, and one to the officers, in which he confessed to twelve murders, but as he was only 22 years of age this is probably pure imagination. In his letter to the officers he tells where to find Genesemere's clothes and $511, and says he had a chum, and is glad they did not get him. So far neither money nor clothes have been found, and it is probable that if he had a chum the money is gone. Opinions prevail that he killed Genesmere with a stone while he was laying down and had no help. He says the victim lived in Muncie, Ind. The murderer has relatives in Cecil, O., a sister at Castalia, O., and other relatives. The letter to Nettie Abbott contains some villainous poetry, and asks her not to marry. He wants to be buried besides his mother in Ohio. Officers had for some time been accumulating circumstantial evidence against Taylor, and had questioned him until he had given up hope and was scared. [Source: Denver [CO] Post, Oct 11, 1894]

Extracted from the Saginaw News, Oct 11, 1894:
August Gansmere, it will be remembered, is the man whom Colonel Bowers, of this city, knew, and who worked in the woods and on the river for some years past. When last in Saginaw he displayed a roll of bills to the colonel and said he was going up north. Taylor, it appears, was with him at the time.

Submitted by Deb Haines
Gillespie, James A Woodchopper Disables Himself and is Killed and Eaten by Wolves
Cheboygan, Mich., April 13.-While John and James Gillespie were chopping in the woods near Mullet Lake, a few miles from here, Saturday, James' ax slipped and sank into his ankle. His brother John attempted to stanch the flow of blood and carry him two miles to the nearest house, but the load and deep snow was too much, and at James' suggestion John started for the settlement alone, leaving James in the snow. John roused a party of rescuers, who started out to bring James. On arriving near the place where John had left his younger brother, they came to a lot of blood stains and wolf tracks in the snow, and following the trail they beheld a pack of wolves growling and fighting over a lot of bones and shreds of clothing. The party beat the wolves off with their axes, as they had no other weapons, and took all that remained of James back to Mullet Lake for burial.
[Source: Jackson Citizen Patriot, Apr 13, 1891; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Gillis, Dan Cheboygan, Mich., May 2.-Dan Gillis, a well known resident, was murdered at Supervisor David Bowen's farm, near Onaway, Saturday evening. It is thought the murderer was waiting to kill Bowen on his return from the supervisor's meeting, and in the darkness mistook Gillis for Bowen and shot him dead.
[Source: The Racine [WI] Daily Journal, May 2, 1899; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Glover, James Seth Obit
Grames, Matilda Obit
Haws, John Lumbermen Drowned
Cheboygan, Mich., Dec 24 - John Haws, William Campbell and Ernest Marquette, employes at McCarthy's lumber camp, while crossing the ice on Mullett Lake Sunday afternoon about twelve miles from here, broke through the ice and were drowned.
[Source: San Jose Mercury, Dec 25, 1900; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Hessel, John Obit
[husband of Angela Newton, Cheboygan Democrat, Nov 22, 1912; submitted by Pat Mixen]
Hill, Peter Peter Hill was killed near Cheboygan Thursday night by a falling tree. He leaves a widow and family.
[Source: Jackson Daily Citizen, Dec 13, 1886; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Hohler, Frank J Cheboygan Business District Suffers Loss Approaching a Million
Cheboygan, Mich., March 8.—Two boys and a man are known to have lost their lives in a fire that destroyed four business blocks today with a property loss of more than $500,000. Firemen tonight were searching, for two other boys reported missing. The bodies of Frank J. Hohler, former alderman; Edward Laway, 8, and Georg Tobias, 1O years of age, have been recovered. Hohler was trapped in his bakery as he attempted to rescue the Laway lad. Cheboygan, Mich., March 8.—One man is dead, two boys are believed to have been killed, and three blocks in the business district are in ruins as the result of a fire which swept Cheboygan today and which was only checked when apparatus from Gaylord and Grayling aided the local fire department. The loss is estimated at from $500,000 to $l,000,000. The fire, which originated in the Frose-Kessler block is believed to have been started by a cigarette carelessly thrown into a waste basket. Frank J. Hohler, a baker, was caught beneath the falling walls of his shop and killed. Allie Neeley, a small boy, saved his own life by taking shelter in a bakeover, and was rescued uninjured by firemen. Two other boys were reported missing after a wall had fallen, showering debris on a crowd of spectators.
[Source: The Grand Forks [ND] Herald, Mar 9, 1922; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Horton, Artie Cheboygan, July 23, 1898
Artie Horton, a 4-year-old child died suddenly Wednesday afternoon, a short time after being taken to a doctor. The doctor ordered the child taken home at once and prescribed. Soon after reaching home the child died. Poison was suspected. The coroner, Dr St Amour, impanneled a jury and held an inquest. The examining physicians, Drs Williams and Tweedale, gave as their opinion that the child died from compression on the lungs and pressure upon the heart from the distended pleural cavities, and not from poisoning or any contagious disease. The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the facts. The doctors who made the post mortem examination were astonished at the condition of the body as the mother said the child only complained the day before, while the condition of the body showed disease had been present for some time.
[Source: Saginaw News, Saginaw, MI; July 23, 1898; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Houle, Mrs. Joseph (Olivene Rivard) Obit
Hubbard, R L Jumps to His Death
Buffalo, N. Y., Jan. 16 - R. L. Hubbard, of Cheboygan, Mich., committed suicide tonight by leaping from the third story of a private hospital. He was an epileptic and became violent while suffering from a severe attack.
[Source: Grand Forks Daily Herald, Jan. 17, 1906; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Huck, Ida The funeral of the late Miss Ida Huck, daughter of the Mr and Mrs Martin Huck, of this city, who died at Cheboygan from inflammation of the stomach, was held Thursday at Marlette from the home of her brother, George Huck, and the interment was in the Moore township cemetery. The deceased was born in Deckerville, Sanillac county, and was 21 years old. Besides her parents, she leaves six brothers and four sisters.
[Source: Saginaw (MI) News, Sept 30, 1901; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Kaunths, John Suicide While Drunk
Farmer Living Near Cheboygan Used a Gun Effectively
Cheboygan, Sept. 26.-John Kaunths, a well known farmer of Burt township, committed suicide by shooting himself with a revolver. It is thought he was under the influence of liquor at the time. Kaunths was a widower and leaves four daughters and four sons. His wife died about a year ago.
[Source: Grand Rapids (MI) Press, Sept 26, 1901; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Kemp, James James Kemp, a Cheboygan (Mich.) man, was killed and his body thrown into the river. The stream was dragged in consequence of the discovery of blood spots near it, and the body caught. [Source: Elkart [IN] Daily Review, Dec 15, 1891]

Cheboygan, Dec. 15.-In the coroner's investigation into the supposed murder of James Kemp, nothing of much importance as to the cause of his death was elicited from the dozen or more witnesses who testified. Chas. Sharbineau has been arrested and jailed on suspicion and other arrests may follow. Sharbineau and Kemp drank freely and both were seen together late on the night of the murder badly intoxicated, and prints of rubber shoes near where the body was found correspond with those Sharbineau wore that night. Bruises were found on the body and face, but they may have been caused by the action of the water while the body was lying on the bottom of the river. The physicians have made a thorough examination of the body and lungs and say that Kemp was dead before he was thrown into the river. This established the fact that he was murdered, but by whom is not and may never be known.
[Source: Bay City Times, Dec 15, 1891; Submitted by Deb Haines]
LaRoche, Mrs A Mrs. A. LaRoche, wife of the late Alex LaRoche, who left here several months ago to visit her daughter, Mrs. Edward Witherspoon, of Cheboygan, died last night. A message bearing the news of her death was received by friends residing here, who were notified that the remains would be brought to this city for interment. The cause of her death was not stated. The funeral will probably take place from the residence of Wm. M. Green, Linn Street, Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.
[Source: Bay City News, Bay City MI; January 28, 1897; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Lathrop, Mrs P M Mrs. P. M. Lathrop, formerly of Concord, in this county, died suddenly of paralysis at Cheboygan, on Tuesday; aged 38 years.
[Source: Jackson Citizen Patriot, Jan 20, 1877; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Laway, Edward Cheboygan Business District Suffers Loss Approaching a Million
Cheboygan, Mich., March 8.—Two boys and a man are known to have lost their lives in a fire that destroyed four business blocks today with a property loss of more than $500,000. Firemen tonight were searching, for two other boys reported missing. The bodies of Frank J. Hohler, former alderman; Edward Laway, 8, and Georg Tobias, 1O years of age, have been recovered. Hohler was trapped in his bakery as he attempted to rescue the Laway lad. Cheboygan, Mich., March 8.—One man is dead, two boys are believed to have been killed, and three blocks in the business district are in ruins as the result of a fire which swept Cheboygan today and which was only checked when apparatus from Gaylord and Grayling aided the local fire department. The loss is estimated at from $500,000 to $l,000,000. The fire, which originated in the Frose-Kessler block is believed to have been started by a cigarette carelessly thrown into a waste basket. Frank J. Hohler, a baker, was caught beneath the falling walls of his shop and killed. Allie Neeley, a small boy, saved his own life by taking shelter in a bakeover, and was rescued uninjured by firemen. Two other boys were reported missing after a wall had fallen, showering debris on a crowd of spectators.
Source: The Grand Forks [ND] Herald, Mar 9, 1922; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Lonner, Mortimer Accidentally Shot - A Boy Killed While Hunting Near Cheboygan
Cheboygan, April 17.-Mortimer Lonner, a young boy, had the top of his head blown off yesterday while hunting with a boy named McPhee. The gun was accidentally discharged. McPhee is a page in the house of representatives at Washington.
[Source: Grand Rapids Press, Apr 17, 1893; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Marquette, Ernest Lumbermen Drowned
Cheboygan, Mich., Dec 24 - John Haws, William Campbell and Ernest Marquette, employes at McCarthy's lumber camp, while crossing the ice on Mullett Lake Sunday afternoon about twelve miles from here, broke through the ice and were drowned.
[Source: San Jose Mercury, Dec 25, 1900; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Marquette, Ray Ashtabula, July 23 - Ray Marquette, first mate of the steamer Frank L. Vance, was killed here this morning. He attempted to pass between two sections of a train being made up, when the engine suddenly backed up, catching Marquette between the sections and crushing him. He died in a few minutes. He was a brother of Captain E. B. Marquette of the Vance. The remains were taken to Cheboygan on the steamer Flower, the captain exchanging boats with Captain Marquette for the trip.
[Source: Ogden (NY) Daily Times, Jul 25, 1895; Submitted by Deb Haines]
McKinnon, A P A P McKinnon, a well known lumberman and ex-alderman of Cheboygan, died at Harper's hospital, Detroit, after an operation for abscess in his side.
[Source: Saginaw News, Apr 25, 1896; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Moore, Robert Robert Moore, a single man employed at one of John C. Brown's camps near Cheboygan, was killed yesterday by logs rolling over him from a sleigh, crushing his skull.
[Source: Saginaw News, Jan 27, 1888; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Newton, AP Death of A. P. Newton
A. P. Newton one of our oldest and best known citizens died last evening after a very brief illness of cholera morbus, being taken sick Tuesday night about 10 o'clock, at his residence. For years the deceased was one of our leading business men, and enterprising citizens and a man whose word was as good as his bond. The deceased was born in Hamburg, New York July 8, 1814, being 78 years of age last July. He came to Mackinac when he was twenty years of age and since then has been indentified with northern Michigan. For years he controlled the fishing business in the vicinity of the straits and accumulated considerable wealth in that business and the mercantile business in Cheboygan and by judicious investment in real estate in early days, though in recent years he made some unfortunate investments, such as the extract factory in Mullet lake, which was destroyed by fire and then rebuilt at a great expeuse, but never proved profitable after rebuilding. He was married twice and leaves a widow and six children by his first wife, viz: five daughters, Mrs. O. B. Weed, of Detroit, Mrs. Joseph Jessup, of Kent county, Mrs. Hessel, Scheueaux Islands, Miss Mary, now with Mrs. Hessel and two sons Eugene and Archibald P. Mr. Newton built the first brick house erected in Cheboygan, the family residence, which was erected in 1871. Notwithstanding the few unfortunate investments in his later years he leaves considerable of an estate so that the bereaved family are well provided for. A telegram was sent yesterday to all the children whose address was known informing them of the serious illness of their father and they are expected on every train that arrives. As is well known to many Mr. Newton was the master spirit in the driving from Beaver islands King Strang and his gang of Mormons.—[Source: Cheboygan Tribune, Sep 3, 1892; Submitted by Pat Mixen]

A P Newton Dead [Source: St. Ignace News, Sep 3, 1892; Submitted by Pat Mixen]
Newton, Mary Obit 1 [Source: Cheboygan News, Feb 1, 1902]
Obit 2 [Source: Cheybogan Democrat, Feb 8, 1902]
[Submitted by Pat Mixen]
Newton, Wilson Newton, Wilson, died April 25, 1917 [Source: St. Ignace Enterprise, May 3, 1917; Submitted by Pat Mixen
Nickerson, EJ E. J. Nickerson was drowned at the mouth of the Cheboygan river Sunday while rafting cedar.
[Source: Sault St Marie (MI) Democrat, July 14, 1887; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Penman, Mrs Mrs Penman, aged 70, of Cheboygan, died Wednesday, literally starved to death. She had plenty to eat, a good appetite, and enjoyed her food, but could not retain it.
[Source: Bay City Times, Bay City MI; January 28, 1897; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Quay, David County Treasurer David Quay died in Cheboygan, aged 68 years. He had been ill for a long time.
[Source: Ironwood Times, (Michigan) October 8, 1898; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Raynolds, Margaret Peacefully Away Does Margaret Raynolds Pass to the Beautiful Home
Late Tuesday Afternoon—Close of a Beautiful Life—Funeral Arrangements.
The many friends of Mrs. Margaret F. Raynolds, widow of the late John F. Raynolds, will be saddened to learn of her death which occurred at the family homestead at No. 97 South Market street at 3:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon. Mrs. Raynolds was 79 years of age, and was probably one of the best known residents of Canton, having lived in this city for many years. Bhe was of a very retiring and unostentatious nature, and one of her last requests was that no unnecessary display be made at the funeral nor extended notices in the press. In conformity with this desire the relatives request that friends kindly omit the sending of flowers. Mrs. Raynolds was born in Chambersburg, Pa., in 1816, and was married to Mr. John F. Raynolds 57 years ago. Her husband died six years ago the 22nd of last month. Mrs. Raynolds has been quite feeble for the past few years, and gradually passed to her final sleep, quietly, peacefully and without pain. Sue was conscious to within a few moments of her death, and almost her last words were that she was ready to go, as the machinery had about run down. Few women possessed the kindly, Christian spirit of Margaret Reynolds. She was a life-long member of the First Presbyterian Church of Croton, and, when health permitted, was identified, with and active in the various branches of church work. Three children survive their beloved mother, Messrs. James A. Raynolds, the eldest, of this city; Charles A. Raynolds, of Chicago, who was present at the hour of death, and George F. Raynolds, of Cheboygan, Mich., who has been notified of the sad event. A granddaughter, Retto Rawson, has been visiting her grandmother for some time. A brother, Mr. W. M. Faber, of Pittsburg, and a sister, Mrs. Henrietta Lahm of Canon City, Colo., are the other immediate relatives. The funeral will occur from the residence Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock, interment being in Westlawn cemetery.
[Source: The Evening Repository, Canton, Ohio; August 14, 1895; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Riggs, George Tug Record Goes Down - One of the Staunchest Tugs on the Lakes Sunk in Ship Canal - Three Lives Lost
Duluth, Minn., June 3 - The tug Record, one of the Inman fleet, and one of the staunchest on the lakes, was run down and sunk in the ship canal just before midnight. Three of the tug's crew went down with their boat. They were: Captain John Bricklet, Elmer Cook, Cheboygan, steward; George Riggs, Cheboygan, engineer. The fireman, Al Davidson, was the only survivor of the tug's crew. The Record met a steamer as she entered the harbor. The strong current setting out into the lake swung the tug broadside against the steamer's stern and Record went down like a shot.
[Source: Oswego (NY) Daily Times, Jun 3, 1898; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Schmidt, Emma Cheboygan, Mich., July 28 - Miss Emma Schmidt, aged 23, daughter of Frederick Schmidt, a wealthy resident of Ann Arbor, was drowned to-day when the steamer Valentine, with forty passengers, went down in the Cheboygan River, after striking a deadhead which pierced her hull. The tug Merchant, which was nearby, hurried to the rescue and took all the passengers and crew on board, with the exception of Miss Schmidt, who returned for her valise.
[Source: Ogden (NY) Daily Times, Jul 30, 1906; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Simmons, Bert

Simmons, C
Blown to Atoms
Cheboygan, Mich., Sept. 30 - Three young hunters were killed in a dynamite explosion when they mistook a dynamite store house in the woods for a deserted hut and used it for a target. The dead are: Bert Simmons, 18; C. Simmons, 15 and Leslie Ehret, 18. The store house belonged to a local hardware firm and was situated about a mile from town. It contained 350 pounds of dynamite. Parts of Ehret's body was found but the other two boys were blown to atoms.
[Source: The Evening News, Sep 30, 1907; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Slenkiewiez, Antony Committed Suicide
Antony Slenkiewiez, whose death at Cheboygan, Mich., was announced in these columns yesterday, committed suicide. The news and manner of his death was communicated to his Williams employers yesterday, in the following telegram:

Cheboygan, Mich., May 24, 1898
To Polson Brothers
Antony Slenkiewiez dead. Committed suicide Saturday night.
Samuel H. Taylor

Mr. Taylor was Slenkiewiez's attorney, and F. O. Polson has sent word to him for particulars, which will be awaited with considerable interest, as Antony was well esteemed in this community. What his motive for self destruction would have been can only be surmised. He was of an emotional temperament, and the deed was probably done on a sudden impulse. Deceased was unmarried. He had a brother in Cheboygan and was distinguished as being a relative of Henry Slenkiewicz, the author of "Quo Vadis." He was descended from Polish nobility, though from his modesty and unassuming ways one would never suspect it. Antony Slenkiewicz came here several years ago as an employe of the Saginaw Lumber company, afterward becoming a salesman for Polson Bros., in which capacity he was efficient and faithful. He had many friends, who were shocked at the news of his death. - Williams News.
[Source: The Albuquerque Daily Citizen, May 27, 1898; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Smith, Emerson Cheboygan, Mich., June 3.-Emerson Smith, aged 47 years, an old resident of Cheboygan, and for years head sawyer in the Duncan mills, was killed this morning at Onaway, at Chandler's camp, by a falling tree. He leaves a widow and four children. He was a member of the Odd Fellows and Foresters. He was popular among mill men and was known as "M".
[Source: Grand Rapids (MI) Herald, June 4, 1899; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Smith, William Bank President Killed
Charlotte, Mich., Sept 25 - President William Smith of the First National bank of this city, was killed at Wolverine by being thrown from a log carrier against a moving saw. Mr. Smith held vast lumber interests in Cheboygan county and went to that point to make general arrangements for the transfer of the property to a Chicago man, who was with Mr. Smith at the time of the accident. Besides controlling the stock of the First National bank he was rated as one of the richest men in the county.
[Source: Fulton Patriot, Sep 26, 1889; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Smyth, Cecelia Mrs Cecelia Smyth, formerly of this city, died at Cheboygan last week, aged 74 years.
[Source: Saginaw News, Saginaw MI; December 9, 1897; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Smyth, William Essex William Essex Smyth, who died recently at Cheboygan, aged 77, was probably the oldest Oddfellow in the state, having joined the order in 1848. He had been mayor of Cheboygan.
[Source: Chronicle, Muskegon MI, September 9, 1896; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Taylor, George Van George Van Taylor, who is in jail in Cheboygan, Mich., charged with the murder of Gus Gensmere, committed suicide Wednesday night by cutting his throat with a razor. In a letter to the officers he confessed that he had committed twelve murders.
[Source: The Mexico [NY] Independent, October 17, 1894; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Tobias, Georg Cheboygan Business District Suffers Loss Approaching a Million
Cheboygan, Mich., March 8.—Two boys and a man are known to have lost their lives in a fire that destroyed four business blocks today with a property loss of more than $500,000. Firemen tonight were searching, for two other boys reported missing. The bodies of Frank J. Hohler, former alderman; Edward Laway, 8, and Georg Tobias, 10 years of age, have been recovered. Hohler was trapped in his bakery as he attempted to rescue the Laway lad. Cheboygan, Mich., March 8.—One man is dead, two boys are believed to have been killed, and three blocks in the business district are in ruins as the result of a fire which swept Cheboygan today and which was only checked when apparatus from Gaylord and Grayling aided the local fire department. The loss is estimated at from $500,000 to $l,000,000. The fire, which originated in the Frose-Kessler block is believed to have been started by a cigarette carelessly thrown into a waste basket. Frank J. Hohler, a baker, was caught beneath the falling walls of his shop and killed. Allie Neeley, a small boy, saved his own life by taking shelter in a bakeover, and was rescued uninjured by firemen. Two other boys were reported missing after a wall had fallen, showering debris on a crowd of spectators.
Source: The Grand Forks [ND] Herald, Mar 9, 1922; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Todd, Fred Capsized and Drowned
St. Ignace, Mich., May 22 - Fred Todd, of Cheboygan, and Robert Wolfkeil, of Denver, Col., employed in the News office here, went out in a sail boat yesterday morning intending to return for dinner. No track of them has been found since but their boat was discovered near British landing, capsized. It is thought that the men perished.
[Source: Grand Forks Daily Herald, May 23, 1893; Submitted by Deb Haines]
Weed, Ellen Weed, Ellen (Mrs. Dr. O'Dillion B. Weed) [Source: Cheboygan Observer, Nov 23, 1933; Submitted by Pat Mixen]
White, Joseph Cheboygan Man Carried Away on an Ice Floe in Lake Huron
Cheboygan, Mich., Dec. 25.-Joseph White, 40 years old, a mail carrier, was frozen to death last night while adrift on an ice floe in Lake Huron a few miles from this port. Fred Roberts, another carrier who was with White was badly frost bitten. After delivering the Christmas mail on Bois Blanc island, two miles out in the lake the two carriers started back for the mainland with their dog sled at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon. When about half way across the straits the ice parted and they found themselves drifting toward the lake. They were exposed to the bitter cold for 28 hours. Some time in the night, White succombed and Roberts was hardly able to crawl ashore tonight when the floe drifted to land 18 miles from Cheboygan.
[Source: Duluth [MN] News Tribune, Dec 26, 1914; Submitted by Deb Haines]

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